Monday, April 4, 2016

Alarmingly Charming by Debra Marvin ends April 11th

 Please welcome Debra Marvin to my blog this week. Read on down to find out enter to win a paperback, ebook, and Austen calendar!

Help Debra Pick the Best Austen Hero!

Mr. George Knightley.
Nightly, or daily, George is the big brother we all wish we had, unless you can’t get past the Angelina Jolie connection. The fact that he’s seventeen years older than Emma—basically could be her father in this day and age—should be ignored. He’s obviously the perfect tempering agent for one Miss
Woodhouse. He’s the true example of loving someone by helping them become their best, true self, if that includes a bit of scolding now and then. But why, I ask, has it taken Mr. K (or allow me to call him Mr. N?) so long to fall for Emma? Was it truly nothing more than platonic affection all this time? Was he hindered by thinking of her as a little sister? (he brought up that brother-sister thing after all. A bit creepy?) Perhaps he’s been molding a spoiled, short-sighted girl into a proper wife? Why was George still a bachelor? And did he ever leave the house other than to wander to the Woodhouse’s wood house? (Wait. I think it was brick.) Frankly…wealthy, single men who barely leave their library have a bit of the gothic about them, don’t you think?

Henry Tilney
Henry is a ‘soul of patience’, or has he simply made it his life’s work to avoid all controversy and tension? Clearly, he’s the good guy in a family of thoughtless men. While a knowledge of muslin doesn’t rank high enough in our modern lives to justify marriage, he does show a fine empathy for the weaker sex. Considering that I wrote a novella based on Northanger Abbey’s characters, I feel I can speak candidly. Were his expectations for a wife low, or did he just think a silly girl with an over-active imagination was a good choice? (perhaps Mr. Tilney needs to speak with Mr. Bennet about that). I know… I know. Catherine Morland had a lovely kindness to her and the truth is, I adore them both. She has such enthusiasm and lack of guile. Mr. Tilney does come with a lot of family baggage, so where does he fall in your ratings? Did you enjoy his sense of humor or was he just a bit too beige for you?

Colonel Brandon
Put your adoration for Alan Rickman aside, and Colonel Brandon does still warrant hero status. But Marianne had good reason to be put off. The Age Difference. The lack of luster. Good thing she didn’t know he saw her as a replacement for an old love. What? You disagree? An old love from decades ago… Oops. Another man in his mid-30s, making him middle-aged in Austen’s day. But let’s skip the 20 year age gap. With his unequaled long-suffering (emphasis on suffering) devotion, he places high in husband material. Sadly he only shines when compared to the brash, hot-blooded and very thoughtless Willoughby. Is Brandon your favorite hero? Kudos to the Colonel! After all…he was still capable of carrying the never-failing-ever-falling Miss Marianne! Quote some poetry for her and all is well.

Edward Ferrars
Edward, the mysterious “Mr. F.” is a good match for Elinor. She’s sensible enough to fall for a gentleman based on his kindness, not his looks (in the book…ahem. Remember we heard nothing about having piercing blue eyes like Matthew Crawley.) Shall we blame his poor choice in Lucy Steele on having a witchy mother, a hit-or-miss libido (perhaps that was good for a man destined for the church), or just youthful inexperience? But having to face his mistake, one wonders if keeping a promise to a woman he doesn’t love was all that heroic? (Shouldn’t he have just manned up and married the woman he loved—the woman with whom he was written to be a perfect match?). I must say he’s not strong hero material, but I think we love him simply for hanging on long enough for Lucy to mess up and win his frightful older brother instead (and that horrid sister-in-law). Was Mr. F wimpy or wonderful?


Captain Wentworth

Here’s Miss Austen’s true self-made man. Eight years after having his heart broken by Anne Eliot, he’s a bit harsh on her. Was it all intentional? Hmmm. The navy made him a man, but he wasn’t quite mature enough to be kind about the fact she’s listened to her elders and avoided running off with a penniless—if good looking--nobody. A few cold-hearted remarks and some flagrant flirtation with her sister’s sisters-in-law set him up for trouble. Oh, what luck. Good old Anne is there to pick up the pieces (not referring to Louisa’s skull, by the way). By now, we’re wondering if maybe she’s better off without him. But no. All’s forgiven when he realizes he’s been a schmuck. Prodded along (like most men) when it’s almost too late to fix things. Ooops, did I say that? Anne might have been weak eight years prior, but he was weak eight days prior. He makes up for it with a perfectly written love letter (thanks to Jane Austen writing it for him). And who cares if he’s a bit weather worn? He’s going to take her away from that loony family!

Edmund Bertram
Edmund has somehow managed to remain untainted by the wackiest Austen family on record, and I credit that with his companionship with the intelligent, analytical (used to be a wretch) Fanny Price. She sometimes can be a downer and judgmental, but after all, she’s been sleeping in a cold attic room for ten years. Edmund cares for Fanny like a sister, not like a cousin. This should raise concerns, but it doesn’t—we’re used to this, right? Fanny’s not so clueless—she’s long been in love with her good, honest, kind friend who reminds us of Mr. Knightley. They made it through puberty, but it isn’t until a new game in town called Mary Crawford comes along that Edmund struggles with…ahem…passion. Really, Eddie? Did you have to share your school-boy crush on Mary with Fanny? Like.She.Wants.To.Hear.It? After Edmund’s sister wrecks the family reputation, he develops a backbone and has an epiphany. Not the sharpest sabre on the wall, was he? Oh all right. I like him, too.

Fitzwilliam D’arcy
There’s not much to say about Darcy that hasn’t been said. We have no idea what he really looked like in that wet shirt, but as a man who spends a lot of time glowering in drawing rooms, let’s hope that horseback riding helped. Mr. Darcy had many years of practice looking down on people. His sister, his housekeeper and his flighty friend Bingley thought he was the cat’s meow. Okay, we’ll go with that. But brooding gets old fast and just how long will that humility last? Has that cat changed its spots? Does he still secretly believe he’s too good for her—certainly for her family? Someday Lizzie will tire of being clever, and he’ll tire of being kind. Once past the courting, I think this wealthy, snobby man might just return to form. Darcy has set up countless generations of impractical expectations. Women like moody men? Really? Is Fitzwilliam’s entire worth based upon a very heartfelt proposal…twice…and taking care of the Wickham mess? Convince me I’m wrong! Or is my “heart not easily touched?”

GIVEAWAY!
So there you have it, ladies. Please let me know where I’m way off or have pegged our Austen heroes. Who’s your choice for number one? Play along. Humor me. I do love them all. I’m giving away a paperback of Austen in Austin to one commenter, and an ebook of Alarmingly Charming to another (please leave your email address safely) Please mention if you’d prefer an ebook or paperback.

I’m hoping to find the biggest Austen fan ever, and for you, I’m giving away a lovely Jane Austen illustrations calendar 2016. “suitable for framing!”

Austen in Austen from WhiteFire Publishing:
Four Texas-Set Novellas Based on Jane Austen's Novels
Discover four heroines in historical Austin, TX, as they find love--Jane Austen style. Volume 1 includes:
If I Loved You Less by Gina Welborn, based on Emma A prideful matchmaker examines her own heart when her protégé falls for the wrong suitor.
Romantic Refinements by Anita Mae Draper, based on Marianne from Sense and Sensibility A misguided academy graduate spends the summer falling in love . . . twice.
One Word from You by Susanne Dietze, based on Pride and Prejudice A down-on-her-luck journalist finds the story of her dreams, but her prejudice may cost her true love . . . and her career.
Alarmingly Charming by Debra E. Marvin, based on Northanger Abbey A timid gothic dime-novel enthusiast tries to solve the mystery of a haunted cemetery and, even more shocking, why two equally charming suitors compete for her attentions.

Four more exciting novellas will follow in volume 2!
Debra’s contact information and bio: Please consider following her FB page!
LINKS: Amazon Author Page: http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B018QCI2AS Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/Debra-E-Marvin-433266640199533 Twitter: https://twitter.com/DebraEMarvin Website: http://debraemarvin.com/ Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/debraemarvin/ Group Blog- Inkwell Inspirations: http://www.inkwellinspirations.com/

ABOUT DEBRA 
Debra E. Marvin tries not to run too far from real life but the imagination born out of being an only child has a powerful draw. Besides, the voices in her head tend to agree with all the sensible things she says. She’d like to live just a wee bit closer to her grandchildren, but is thankful that God is in control, that He chooses to bless us despite ourselves and that He has a sense of humor.
Other than writing light-hearted romances and gritty gothics, she has pretty normal obsessions: fabric, peanut butter, vacations, British dramas and whatever mystery series she’s currently reading. Visit her at debraemarvin.com, the Inkwell Inspirations Blog, @debraemarvin on twitter and Debra E Marvin on Facebook and Pinterest, but not her house because she usually has dirty dishes.

37 comments:

  1. Thanks for hosting me, Debbie Lynne! I hope we have some good discussions. I love the Austen heroes, but I'm not ALL DARCY ALL THE TIME! I love whichever one I'm with. Figuratively...

    Happy new week! it's nasty winter here in Upstate NY! ugh.

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  2. O...love this! I know many will c
    House Mr. Knightley, but isn't he just too....perfect? I'm a Mr. Darcy girl because he's flawed. And I think he was humbled by Elizabeth and the whole Wickham & Lydia business. He knows that his pride have hurt others. And with Lizzie's wit, I imagine that it will keep him in line. Someone who's willing to see, accept their faults and try to change for the better is a hero in my sense! Colonel Brandon is my close second. thanks for the giveaway!

    Annie
    justcommonlyATgmailDOTcom

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    1. Annie, I thought you had a copy of A in A. No?

      I think they are all flawed! But that's what makes them so wonderfully human. In a way, the fun with Jane Austen fan fiction, or "Austen-inspired" is that we get to add the viewpoints of our favorite gentlemen. Austen had us create our opinions only from their words and actions --which is often enough! Thanks for stopping in!

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  3. Yes I do Debra! But I would love that calendar, all thing Jane Austen! Should've said it! Thanks!

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    1. Thanks for mentioning it! I'd love to see it go to someone who'll cherish it! Janet Taylor creates them and I have one. I'm hoping to do something crafty with it after 2016 is over!

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  4. Of course Mr. Darcy calls for top position, just because. Mr. Knightly does nudge me to say he comes in second. I don't know why - he just does! I agree with Annie, I love the flawed, humbling characteristics of them all. Darcy, of course, the most. ;)
    lattebooksAThotmailDOTcom
    (I would adore a paperback of AinA!)

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    1. Just Because! I absolutely expect Mr. Darcy to come out on top of our hero rating, but I wanted readers to take a moment to think beyond the romance of the 'second' proposal scene. Just as Lizzy throws his remarks back at him the first time, I wanted to see him outside of those glorious moments for what he'd be like on any other given day. Thanks for playing along Susan!

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  5. I'll say Mr. Knightly! I prefer paperback! (jarning67(at)hotmail(dot)com)

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    1. The fun part of working on this post was that it made me look at all aspects of the characters. If I think about Mr. Knightley's lovely traits, and then I step back and think... what about all the other things we don't think of because Miss Austen has redirected us? Thanks Joan!

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  6. Oh yes, these heroes are flawed. Aren't we all? However, Austen masterfully shows them as more than flawed and sees beyond to something heroic in them all. huletthouse at mchsi dot com

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    1. She is definitely a master at making us face our own motivations! Thanks for leaving your email address this time :) She must have been a very observant person, able to see past what many of us miss.

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  7. I read Jane Austen when I was in high school, maybe I need to go back and re-read it again.
    Thanks for entering me in your giveaway.
    Janet E.
    von1janet(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Thanks, Janet. I actually have listened to them all on audiobook borrowed from the library, instead of trying to read them. Most of my reading is audiobook or Text to Voice on Kindle. Hearing them read is such a treat! Thanks for being part of the blog post conversation!

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  8. I've not yet read an Austen novel....but have read almost all of Julie Klassen's regency novels (which maybe is a close second?). I do enjoy the era!

    teamob4 (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. Well, I'm glad you popped in for the discussion and the giveaway. Not having read any Austen novels will not alter your enjoyment of the Austen in Austin novellas. They stand on their own with characters and plot lines--The Austen fan will see how we played with hers--but at their heart, they are sweet romances set in Austen in the 1880s.
      Thanks, Trixi!

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  9. I love Colin Firth's Mr. Darcy, and I think he's been changed by knowing Elizabeth.
    Captain Wentworth doesn't sound familiar here, but maybe the movie I saw was kinder to him than the book. I don't think I've read it.
    I prefer holding a book in my hands over a kindle. tlw131 (at) gmail (dot) com

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    1. Thanks Terri! There are two well-known versions of Persuasion (and Captain Wentworth) hanging out in my DVD rack, and they've given him different nuances there. I think that's the fun of all the productions--a nice way to give new views of well-known characters. I imagine a lot of people only know Mr. Darcy from one or two productions, but that certainly seems to be enough!

      You're in the drawing! thank you!

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  10. Darcy is my absolute favorite. Thanks for the giveaway.

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    1. Thanks for commenting. Please keep in touch or add your email address, safely! I'm certainly not surprised at the size of the Darcy fan club!

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  11. Darcy is my absolute favorite. Thanks for the giveaway.

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  12. I really enjoyed all of your clever descriptions of each Austen man.
    Mr. Darcy is, for me, the One.
    I enjoyed his ability to "come around" finally and to share the feelings he has for his sister and dear friend with Lizzy and Jane. His world expands as he looks beyond the obvious and becomes more accepting of what he's unfamiliar with.
    Thank you for this opportunity!
    WandaJS
    austentatious 4 ever at gee mail dotcom

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    1. Wanda, thanks SO much for coming over to play. There were so many ways Darcy found humility suited him much more than keeping that wall he'd created. I think that's the sweet spot, really. A gentleman who opens his heart like he did. It was a tremendous act of humility!

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  13. Great post on the these heroes, especially because we can see the characteristics of them all like this. Can I just that Colonel Brandon is my fav. .)

    Thanks for hosting Deb and Austen in Austin, Debbie Lynne.

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  14. Good thing Colonel Brandon is your favorite, Anita! I watched the S and S version last weekend --the one with David Morrissey as the Colonel. I was really taken with him when I first saw it (much as I enjoyed Alan Rickman!)

    and readers will love what you do in your Austen novella with another lonely war hero! wink wink.

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  15. Great post. XD Love the descriptions.
    My favourite Austen hero would have to be Captain Wentworth. Yep, he's the one for me. ;) But Henry Tilney and Edward Ferris are SO close on the list...
    :D

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    1. Raechel. I still can't decide. Seriously. And I've had two hundred years to figure it out... in a way.
      I must admit that I certainly became enamored with Rupert Penry Jones as the captain. When he walked in that door and Anne had to face him, I felt a bit weak-kneed myself. But I don't discount the Ciaran Hinds portrayal at all.
      Thanks for commenting!

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    2. Hehe, it's a hard choice!
      I've only seen that version once - I've seen the Ciaran Hinds one, well, let's say a lot more than once. ^.^ Both are good, though from having seen 1995 one first, I guess that had the lead for favourite for me. :D

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    3. agreed! I didn't see the 1995 version until after that Masterpiece Austen season we had, so as far as looks went... I was the one who fell for blonde hair and blue eyes. Hinds brought a lot more depth to the role, though.

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  16. Ebook please. They all sound like great stories. My absolute favorite is Darcy.

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    1. Thanks for commenting, Patty! We love the stories and hope readers do, too. They're a fun mix of Austen, and the late Victorian era, and Cowboys! Austin TX was the perfect setting for this story, in a number of ways!

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  17. AND THE WINNERS ARE....Ebook winner of Alarmingly Charming is Patsy Edmission
    Calendar winner is Annie at Just Commonly
    Paperback winner of Austen in Austin is Trixi O

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  18. Yay....so happy :-) Thank you & congats to Patsy and Annie JC!

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    1. I really messed up Patty's name (blame me for writing it down wrong and passing it on that way to Debbie Lynne! I've contacted the winners, including PATTY! Thanks everyone!

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  19. Congratulations, ladies!
    I will have to comfort myself with a reread and a relisten to my books and Austen books on tape!
    Wait! That's not a bad thing either! Congrats!

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