Tuesday, March 1, 2016

A Cowboy's Bride by Nancy Farrier ends March 8th




Please welcome Nancy Farrier to my blog. Nancy is giving away a copy of her book, A Cowboy's Bride so be sure to read on down to find out how to enter.

California’s Super Flood 1861-1862
In my latest release, Crazy About Cait, (The Cowboy’s Bride Collection), I give readers a look into the difficulties early ranchers faced during the severe drought in the late 1860’s, California. In my research, I came across an interesting bit of California history that happened prior to the major drought. I wanted to share that with you today.

By the fall of 1861, farmers and ranchers were praying for rain. They had been suffering two decades of little rainfall. Their lands and herds needed water. While the Eastern half of the country struggled with the devastation of the Civil War, California prayed for rain.

Those prayers were answered in a way those ranchers and farmers hadn’t expected. Beginning in December of 1861 and going through January of 1862, Californians faced four huge storms that dumped an unprecedented amount of rain. The storms occurred December 9th, December 23rd-28th, January 9th-12th and January 15th-17th. The latter storm was the worst of them all.

In early December 1861, the Sierra Nevada mountains, east of Central California, saw a snowfall of ten to fifteen feet. By the 9th of December, when the rains started, the temperatures had risen to

record highs for that time of year. The snow began to melt, running off the mountain into the valleys below.

In the Central valleys entire settlements were wiped out from the flooding. People, cattle, horses and other animals drowned in the fields as the water reached levels of 30 feet. Even the telegraph poles were submerged. Along the Yuba River, an entire settlement of Chinese miners drowned as their town washed away.


The day the final storm began in January, was the inauguration day, in Sacramento, for the new Governor, Leland Stanford. The rain that day came
down so hard that some said a man could drown where he stood. Although the inauguration wasn’t cancelled, the ceremony had to be moved inside the Capitol building. The new Governor had to travel by rowboat from his mansion to the Capitol. The ceremony was shortened, but by the time Governor Stanford returned home, he had to direct the rowboat to a second story window to enter his home.
Throughout Sacramanto the flood waters were measured at ten feet deep. The banks of the river couldn’t be seen any more. The city remained under water for three months before everything began to dry out.
In other parts of California the rains caused landslides and mudslides that haven’t been equaled since. Homes, and sometimes whole towns were destroyed. Buildings were ripped from their foundations.

One of the reports said that 32 inches of rain fell in
forty-eight hours during one of the January storms. Los Angeles reported a rainfall of more than sixty-six inches, four times more than the annual rainfall.
I’m sure most Californians thought the drought had ended. Rivers would be running. Lakes filled up. Cattle and horses would have plenty of feed. Gardens would produce. Sad to say within a very short time an even more severe drought began. A drought that would ruin many a rancher.

GIVEAWAY
Have you ever experienced a flood? Or, perhaps where you live they have struggled with drought. I would love to hear about your experience, or thoughts. Please leave a comment below about one of the above questions to be entered to win a copy of The Cowboy’s Bride.



Ride onto the open range alongside cowboys and cowgirls who embrace the adventures of living in the Old West from Kansas to New Mexico, Colorado to Texas. Whether rounding up cattle or mustangs, training horses, fending off outlaws, weathering storms, competing in rodeos, or surviving drought these cowboys work hard each day. But when hardheaded men have their weaknesses exposed by well-meaning women will they stampede away or will a lasting love develop? Find out in this exciting collection of nine historical romances.

About Nancy:
Nancy J Farrier is an award winning author who lives in Southern California in the Mojave Desert. She loves the Southwest with its interesting historical past. Nancy and her husband have five children and two grandsons. When Nancy isn’t writing, she loves to read, do needlecraft, play with her cats, and spend time with her family. Nancy is represented by Karen Ball of The Steve Laube Literary Agency. You can read more about Nancy and her books on her website: nancyjfarrier.com.

54 comments:

  1. I live in west Texas, so we don't experience floods. We do, however, experience droughts. You start finding creative ways to save water to use in the garden, etc.

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    1. Yes, I live in the desert and know some of those creative ways. Thanks for commenting, Susan.

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  2. Well, I live in Memphis and we have experienced floods from the Mississippi river several times. Thankfully, I don't live very close to the river so I wasn't affected by it. However, my husband's grandparents had to be rescued by boat out of their home. Thankfully, they were fine. Just lost a few possessions, but at least they were good. God is so good like that.

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    1. I've seen pictures of the Mississippi during a flood. That would be scary to be rescued by boat. Thanks for sharing, Dana.

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  3. In 1973, I believe it was, we had a huge flood in Vermont that wiped out bridges and roads all over the state. I remember because, first, I was a senior in high school and had a job that required driving, and secondly, I had a boyfriend! He saved the day for me when I got stranded on the work side of a bridge and I needed to get home. He drove miles and miles out of the way just to pick me up. He was, and still is, a keeper!

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    1. What a sweet story, Connie. Thank you for sharing.

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  4. North Platte has experienced both Floodings and Droughts the city is along the North Platte river. The worst flooding was in the 1930's long before I was born. They do a pretty good job of blocking off the streets near the river here. NO major flooding in homes but last year a young teenage couple lost there lives by driving on a street next to the river was 2 months of misery for the families and the city.

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    1. Drownings are so very sad, Kim. Some rivers do flood every year. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. I've never experienced major flooding, but I live in SC and many parts of the state experienced devastating flooding this past year.

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    1. I've read about the storms and floods in your State. Very sad. Thanks for stopping by, Patty.

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  6. An interesting post, Nancy - thank you!!

    I've never experienced a flood, however, the area just a few miles from me (Louisville, Ky.) was involved in the 1937 Ohio River Flood - which involved several states. One million were left homeless, 385 died, and property loss was comparable to 8.7 billion dollars per 2015 rates. 70% of Louisville was under water and the river gauge there set a record of 57 feet.

    Thanks for the giveaway opportunity, Nancy!!

    I am a feedburner follower.

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    1. Wow, what a devastating flood, Bonnie. Thanks for sharing the story.

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  7. I am in West Texas so I have seen a lot of drought. Interestingly enough, I live between two towns that had some minor flooding on days when we got a small amount of rain. I already follow you with feed burner

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    1. Jan, thank you for stopping by and commenting. Drought and flooding are both very difficult.

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  9. We lived in Colorado around 2000 when there was drought. We were very nervous especially for wild fires, as we lived at 9500ft right next to the national forest. I already follow on FB. Thanks so much for the giveaway :)

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    1. Betti, yes, in dry times forest fires are a scary possibility. Thank you for sharing.

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  10. We have had a couple little floods but I believe there was a big one in "85" But I don't really remember anything except a kid died in it Thanks for the chance to win The Book looks good I like Western settings and Brides Too Thanks for sharing Debbie

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    1. Linda, I enjoy western settings too. Thank you for commenting.

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  11. My mother's former house once had water up all around it and also seeping through the cracks in the basement but thankfully it stopped at that point because I could not convince her to leave the house. They moved out of that area soon after the flood waters receded.

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    1. The clean up after a flood is an arduous task. I know basements can flood pretty easy. I'm glad your mother was okay. Thanks for stopping by.

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  12. Back in the '90's, my toddler daughter and I visited my father in Cedar Rapids just in time for the Cedar River to inundate the downtown with a flash flood. We circled around on the elevated interstate for several hours until the water receded enough off the exit ramps for us to drive home. It was terrifying to see a familiar landscape obliterated by angry muddy waters. I would love to win the book. dsks88atgmaildotcom

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    1. Sandy, flood waters can change the landscape and wash away areas. Thank you for stopping by.

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  13. We had a MAJOR flood here a few years ago. Lives were lost. The town was cut off for a week.

    I have experienced floods before, quite often over the years, but nothing on this scale.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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    1. Mary, the thing I dislike most about floods is the loss of life. So sad. Thank you for commenting.

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  14. I live in Arizona and when it rains, the desert often has a lot of runoff. It can be destructive in destroying property and the scenery.
    jwisley(at)aol(dot)com

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    1. Joye, I lived in Arizona for years and experienced those flash floods. Very destructive. Thanks for stopping by.

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  15. I'm thankful to have never experienced a flood--though it has been quite rainy this winter--or a severe drought. I'd love to win Nancy's book.

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    1. Ginger - waving wildly :) - so nice to see you here. Thanks for stopping by.

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  16. No I have not lived through a flood but I have lived through a hurricane and a tornado. I am sure a flood would be very scary as well.
    marypopmom (at) yahoo (dot) com
    Maryann

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    1. Maryann, I grew up in the midwest. Tornados and tornado warnings were a part of life, but were also very frightening. Thank you for commenting.

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  17. Wow, that is some story! Little known facts from the past coming alive for us. I have not been in a flood - a drought, yes - the SW Desert is always in a drought. I don't know how some of the farmers survive without complex irrigation systems around Phoenix, Tucson, and in between. Would love to win this and get acquainted with your writing, as I haven't read anything of yours yet! jeaniedannheim (at) ymail (dot) com

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    1. I lived in AZ for years and understand the drought there. The farmers have so much work to irrigate their crops. Thank you for sharing.

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  18. We were in a flood last spring, we were floating/camping at the river, the water came up unexpectedly, 8 feet in 8 hours. We had camped on a high spot & had to walk up a steep incline to get to our tent. Hubby woke me up in the middle of the night & said we have to pack up & get out of here. He was not sure that we could safely leave, was thinking about leaving all of our equipment up in the woods and hiking out of there. Thankfully, we had a small motor on our flat bottomed boat & that helped us to get out quicker. By the time we left, our boat was even with our tent & still moored, but floating past the tent, downstream. Such is the weather in Arkansas.

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  19. We were in a flood last spring, we were floating/camping at the river, the water came up unexpectedly, 8 feet in 8 hours. We had camped on a high spot & had to walk up a steep incline to get to our tent. Hubby woke me up in the middle of the night & said we have to pack up & get out of here. He was not sure that we could safely leave, was thinking about leaving all of our equipment up in the woods and hiking out of there. Thankfully, we had a small motor on our flat bottomed boat & that helped us to get out quicker. By the time we left, our boat was even with our tent & still moored, but floating past the tent, downstream. Such is the weather in Arkansas.

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    1. What a story. I'm so glad you made it to safety. Thank you for commenting.

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  20. I have not experienced a flood. The closest was when the river that runs by my hometown in Colorado had risen beyond its banks but not to the point of calling it a flood. Right now the state in which I live is having drought problems. But it is mostly concentrated in an area awY from my town.

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    1. Thank you for stopping by and for commenting, Jackie. Even a river that is not out of its banks can be frightening in its power.

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  21. Two years ago we had flash flooding in Oklahoma from a Super Cell that spawned aeveral tornadoes. We were unable to get back to our then home, an RV at a park that had 5 creeks to cross. We drove through waters the next morning that were later blocked as inaccesible. We were now stuck though not in danger. We did not know how long it would be before we no longer have to live in 'survivor mode'. It was actually just a few days.

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    1. Wow, Shari. That must have been worrisome to be cut off. I'm glad you came through okay. Thanks for sharing.

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  22. We don't have floods often. One time though each end of our road was flooded and we could not get out for a day.

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    1. Tammy, even being cut off for a day can be an annoyance. I'm glad you don't have floods often. Thanks for stopping by.

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  23. I worked at a campground for the last two summers that was located along a creek. There were several times that the campers along the creek had to be evacuated to higher sites, but it always happened while I was off. Lucky me!

    Doreen
    PriviesAndPrims at yahoo dot com

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    1. Doreen, how fun to work at a campground. I am glad you didn't have to deal with the evacuations though. Thanks for commenting.

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  24. Growing up along the Texas Gulf Coast, I have experienced both flood and drought. My family never left during hurricane season. Our home was on the highest point. After Hurricane Ike, High Island was surrounded by water. Not an easy time as you can imagine.

    psalm103and138 at gmail dot com

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    1. Caryl, I have never experienced a hurricane, but I've seen news reports of those high winds. I'm glad you were okay. Thanks for sharing.

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  25. Interesting story of needing rain and getting flooded in early california. I went through a hurricane in Texas while pregnant with my first son, Lots of water and had to be rescued from the house of my sister by a rowboat and taken to shelter.

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    1. What a story. Hard to imagine getting in a rowboat when you were pregnant. Thank you for commenting.

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  26. Here in Alabama we've experienced many tornadoes. A devastating one hit our city in 2011 destroying homes, businesses, and sadly several lives.

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    1. Gail, I remember tornadoes that were very damaging to whole towns. Thanks for stopping by.

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  27. Missouri (St Louis) is very close to the Mississippi. The Mississippi seems to flood each year (some yrs worse than others...remember 1993?). And there are still people that rebuild each yr. They say they love the flow of the water!

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    1. Yes, the Mississippi does seem to flood often, some years worse than others. It's hard to see. Thank you for commenting.

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  28. Congratulations Paula! YOu won Nancy's book! We will be contacting you soon.

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  29. Thanks Debbie for the shout out, lot of interesting comments today, I know I will enjoy reading this book and will do review on my blog and on goodreads.
    thanks

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