Sunday, April 12, 2015

The Power of Loss PLUS - A Stranger's Secret - GIVEAWAY! Ends April 20th

The Power of Loss
by Laurie Alice Eakes 

Please welcome Laurie Alice Eakes to my blog this week. Laurie Alice is generously giving away a copy of her new release, A Stranger's Secret. Read on down to find out how to enter. 
Have you lost anyone or anything precious to you?

Right before I wrote this book, I lost my mother. We hadn’t always gotten along, but in the past several years, we had developed a great relationship, even if I didn’t see her very often due to geographical distance between us. She was my biggest fan, and I felt like a part of myself had been ripped away.

That pain, however, helped me to write Morwenna’s story.

From the beginning of my concept for the Cornwall series, I had a vision for Morwenna. She was the black sheep of the family. When her older cousin, Elizabeth from A Lady’s Honor learns that Morwenna is in trouble, Her first reaction is to ask, “What has she done now.” Not “What has she done?” or “What happened to her?” No, it’s that “now” that tells the tale of how Morwenna is perceived in her family--expected to do no right and take the blame when something goes wrong.

And Morwenna lives up to this reputation. She is a bad girl from a good family, so when she needs her family to believe in her the most, they don’t.

This is where Morwenna is coming from in A Stranger’s Secret. She has lost her family’s respect and support. Before that, she has faced loss all her life. Her parents abandoned her to the authoritarian mercies of her grandparents. Seeking love, she has lost her reputation, something of great value in nineteenth century England. Then, when she tries to do something right, she loses her husband. At the beginning of A Stranger’s Secret, Morwenna is on the verge of losing her home, her son, and, ultimately, her freedom if she is convicted of a horrendous crime and imprisoned.

Then she meets David, a man from a different social class and with a different perspective on life, and Morwenna faces possibly the scariest loss of all--her heart to a stranger she doesn’t quite trust.

Morwenna doesn’t always handle her losses with grace. She is often angry to cover up her hurt. This is the story of how she rises above her grief and anger, accepts grace, and learns to love.

What has helped yu recover from a loss in your life, whether a parent, a spouse, or even a beloved pet?

Do, please, share your wisdom or feel free to ask a question of your own. I am giving away a copy of A Stranger’s Secret. Paperback version only to those living in the 48 contiguous United States, or an ebook to anyone regardless of residence. 

MORE ABOUT LAURIE ALICE:

“Eakes has a charming way of making her novels come to life without being over the top,” writes Romantic times of  bestselling, award-winning author Laurie Alice Eakes. Since she lay in bed as a child telling herself stories, she has fulfilled her dream of becoming a published author, with a degree in English and French from Asbury University and a master’s degree in writing fiction from Seton Hill University contributing to her career path. Now she has nearly two dozen books in print.

After enough moves in the past five years to make U-Haul’s stock rise, she now lives in Houston, Texas, where she and her husband are newly minted church leaders. Although they haven’t been blessed with children—yet--they have sundry lovable dogs and cats. If the carpet is relatively free of animal fur, then she is either frustrated with the current manuscript, or brainstorming another, the only two times she genuinely enjoys housekeeping.

As a grieving young widow, Morwenna only wants a quiet life for herself and her son. Until a man washes ashore, entangling her in a web of mystery that could threaten all she holds dear.


Lady Morwenna Trelawny Penvenan indulged in her fair share of dalliances in her youth, but now that she's the widowed mother to the heir of the Penvenan title, she's desperate to polish her reputation. When she's accused of deliberately luring ships to crash on the rocks to steal the cargo, Morwenna begins an investigation to uncover the real culprits and stumbles across an unconscious man lying in the sea's foam—a man wearing a medallion with the Trelawny crest around his neck.

The medallion is a mystery to David Chastain, a boat builder from Somerset. All David knows is that his father was found dead in Cornwall with the medallion in his possession after lying and stealing his family's money. And he knows the widow who rescued him is impossibly beautiful—and likely the siren who caused the shipwreck in the first place—as well as the hand behind whoever is trying to murder David.

As Morwenna nurses David back to health and tries to learn how he landed on her beach, suspicion and pride keep their growing attraction at bay. But can they join together to save Morwenna's name and estate and David’s life? Can they acknowledge the love they are both trying to deny?

27 comments:

  1. God has been the biggest help to get through the tough situations in my life. I can't imagine where I'd be without his hope, grace, and mercy. To him be the glory, because I am soo incredibly weak.

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    1. Amen, Kate! I don't know how people who don't have God manage. He is our strength!

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  2. Faith in God and the fact that I will see my son again are the only things that have gotten me through the loss of my son 19 years ago.

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    1. Awe, I am so sorry. Losing a child is devastating. I'm glad you have the hope that Christ gives us. God bless you!!

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  3. A lot of prayer, the comfort from family and friends and telling myself that my loved one is no longer suffering from whatever problems they may have had.

    wfnren at aol dot com

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    1. Do true, Wendy. Prayer takes us a long way. Its like God's arms wrapping around us and hugging us.

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  4. My parents are both gone.. My dad was the hardest loss, on Christmas Eve..I remember him with good stories & thoughts on Christmas Eve :)
    dkstevensne AToutlookDotCooM

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    1. Losing a loved one on a holiday is so sad. But in some ways I can see where it can be turned to positive, like you have done. What an awesome way to keep your father's memories alive than to tell stories and thoughts of him on Christmas Eve.

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  5. The last two years(really 5 or so) I have been loosing my mother to Alzheimer's but God has been with me, hearing me cry out for mercy and peace for both of us. He has answered so wonderfully in His still sweet voice, I am with you and I will give you Peace, not of the world but Me, I am your Peace. So now mom doesn't know me, but enjoys a devotion with me and perhaps a hymn or two and always prayer together. I have gained knowing my Savior even deeper/closer than I did before. Gratitude is my response to loss because of all He is and will be as He and I walk through the loss. I can't wait to read your book Laurie, and may I say how sorry I am for your loss but how blessed we are for your writing . . . this book will touch many who are grieving . . . praying for it to be so even now. Jesus Today is the devotional we read together . . .inviting His Presence in each moment. Big hugs to you and the Lord comforts you as you grieve. chris_davebures@bellsouth.net

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    1. Chris, I'm so sorry about your mother. My MIL has alzeheimers disease. We were close friends all my married life and seeing what the disease does is heart breaking. God is so good to be there for us.

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  6. My sympathy in the loss of your Mother. I still have mine but I do know someday soon God may take her home. It's hard to watch your parents become so fragile, when you'd like to see them as they were in the past but we must remember that they have lived their lives and as with my Grandma who used to say "I ready to go - I've lived long enough". They do become tired as they get older.

    I love your stories Laurie have read quite a few of your books. Tho' with this one I think I'd like to read the first one in the series first.

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    1. Hey Becky. It feels like our parents should always be young and able to do what they have always done. It is so hard to see them slow down. I lost my grandmother a year and a half ago and she was like your grandma. Ready to go. But I wasn't ready for her to and I told her that all the time! My sister came to me and told me I had to tell Grandma it was okay to go. That i understood. It was the hardest thing to do but I did and 2 days later she died. I really believe she held on for me.

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  7. I always get ministered to by your writing. Would love to win this. My grandparents and parents are all in heaven. Past year I lost several Sunday School teachers who mentored me. Jrs362 at hotmail dot com

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  8. Our strength and comfort always comes from God. A person needs to give themselves a few weeks or months to grieve but then get on with life and doing for others rather than dwelling on what you have lost. jarning67(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  9. Hey Joan. Not only our strength but our comfort comes from Him who loves us more than any one else. What an awesome God we serve.

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  10. Having loved ones around me for support helps immeasurably. Just as I am their support.

    marypres(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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  11. Mary, loved ones do help me especially when they are praying for and with me.

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  12. I have three main things that have gotten me through loss: God, time and talking about that person. My mom passed away 14 years ago and I still talk about her and my memories of her with my husband and children. Thanks for the interview and giveaway. I love Laurie's books and am looking forward to reading this one. momrain(AT)aol(DOT)com

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  13. Trying this again. I did comment, and, for some reason, they never showed up. First of all, thank you all for stopping by and sharing. I agree with Debbie Lynne: How can anyone survive loss without the strength of the Lord?

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  14. Becky, If you win, I will send you a copy of A Lady's Honor instead of A Stranger's Secret. Actually, I will extend this offer to all of you.

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  15. Yea! My comments seem to be publishing now.

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  16. I lost my dear aunt not long ago. Her mind had been fading for a few years so what I chose to dwell on was that she is now whole in mind and spirit being in a much better place.

    mauback55 at gmail dot com

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  17. 13 years ago I lost my mother and my baby at the six month mark, without the Lord I don't know how I would have made it. His comfort is beyond words!
    worthy2bpraised at gmail dot com

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  18. Merry, so sorry for your losses. I think we are all grateful that we have a higher power to help us through those rough times.

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  19. Laurie, I am so sorry for your loss of your mother.Watching your parents age is a difficult thing and losing them can be very difficult.Both of my parent's have passed. My mom 20 years ago, and my dad 4 years ago.
    My late husband of 46 years passed almost 3 years ago.
    The only way I have gotten through this is by prayer and God's grace and mercy.
    I am also grateful, and make a point everyday of thanking God for the gifts of life, breath and a working mind that He still blesses me with, because I have watched those i love lose theirs.
    I also have to say that grief in any form is a very personal thing, and no one should or can move through it , until you can. It can't be limited to a time period. every day is different and every day can bring a new challenge. Use a grief support group if you need to, and let God heal you in His time and way.
    Debbie, my dad had dementia and my husbands mind and ability to speak were taken by cancer, so I understand how heartbreaking this is. I will keep your family in prayer. And i am sorry about you MIL.
    You are also right having to tell someone you love that it is o k to go is every bit as hard for me as knowing they are dying and for myself I could not have done it without the Lord.
    Thank you for this post, it is a difficult one to be sure.
    i follow your blog. mcnuttjem0{at}gmail{dot}com

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  20. We have all had losses that are so hard to get through. Mine was my grandmother whom I was so close to before the dementia claimed her. I choose to remember the happy memories I have with her and not as she was in th end. God's comfort has helped me tremendously to get through this. I am a feedburner follower as well. Thank you for the giveaway opportunity.
    Deanne
    Cnnamongirl(at)aol(dot)com

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