Monday, October 20, 2014

A Mother for His Children by Jan Drexler ends October 27th


Please welcome Jan Drexler to my blog. Jan is giving away a copy of her book to one lucky winner! Be sure to read all the way through to be entered to win. Remember to leave your email addy and let me know if you are a feedburner follower for an extra chance to win. (Paperback or e-book in the US, e-book only outside the US.)

I’d like to share the story behind the story of A Mother for His Children.

Levi Zook, the hero of the book, has been a widower for just over a year when our story opens. When his wife died, he was left with ten children to raise. The oldest set of twins were fifteen, and the youngest little boy was four. Levi’s main concern was that his children needed a mother – and quickly – before his older sister convinced the church leaders to divide the children into different homes.

But it isn’t easy to find a woman who is willing to take on the task of mothering ten children! Levi had attempted to court Ellie Miller, the heroine of my first book, The Prodigal Son Returns (Love Inspired Historical, May 2013), with disastrous results. So he decides that a housekeeper is what he needs until – and if – he finds a wife.

This is where Ruthy Mummert enters the story. She had been courted by Elam, back in Lancaster County, for eight years before he threw her over for her best friend. So in one blow she lost her future husband and the friend who had been as close as a sister ever could be. Not wanting to remain at home where she would see the happy couple on a daily basis, she answers Levi’s ad for a housekeeper and flees to faraway LaGrange County in Indiana.

But Levi is dreading the news he has to break to her when she arrives…somehow, he forgot to mention that she would be caring for ten children!

But now the story behind the story! Levi’s quest to find a new wife was inspired by the story of my great-great grandfather, Elias Schrock. His first wife, Nancy Ann, died of tuberculosis in 1900. Only his youngest daughter was still at home when Elias became a widower, and she already had plans for her own wedding. I think that probably helped to increase his loneliness. He married again only a year later, to his first wife’s widowed sister, Mary. 


Elias and Mary, with his daughters, son-in-law and grandson

How did Elias and Mary’s wedding come about? Which one of them first had the idea of marriage? How did Elias’s daughters react to their new step-mother?

These are the questions that brought Levi and Ruthy together.

But, of course, Levi and Ruthy’s courtship couldn’t be as simple as reality! Sometimes I wondered if these two would ever end up loving each other! Of course there’s a happily ever after ending, but not before some unexpected twists and turns.


Jan is giving away a copy of A Mother for His Children. To be entered to win, be sure to ask Jan a question or answer the question: Do you think you could marry a man who had 10 children? 

More about Jan:
Jan Drexler lives in the Black Hills of South Dakota with her husband of more than thirty years, their four adult children, two active dogs, and Maggie, the cat who thinks she’s a dog. If she isn’t sitting at her computer ruining – I mean living – the lives of her characters, she’s probably hiking in the Hills or the Badlands, enjoying the spectacular scenery.

Jan’s debut novel, The Prodigal Son Returns, was published by Love Inspired in May 2013, and her second novel, A Mother for His Children, was the winner of the 2013 TARA Contest, Inspirational Category. It is available now from Love Inspired.

Buy her book here:
Harlequin: http://www.harlequin.com/storeitem.html?iid=53060
Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Mother-Children-Love-Inspired-Historical/dp/037328277X/ref=tmm_mmp_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1406827861&sr=8-1
Barnes and Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/a-mother-for-his-children-jan-drexler/1118736807?ean=9780373282777

Find her here:
Website: www.JanDrexler.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/JanDrexlerAuthor?ref=hl
Twitter: www.twitter.com/JanDrexler
And on Mondays at the Yankee-Belle Café: http://yankeebellecafe.blogspot.com/


32 comments:

  1. LOL, no, I don't think I could marry a man with 10 children, I had 3 and that was enough for me. Of course if I were Amish that could change as they grow up wanting larg families.

    wfnren(at)aol(dot)com

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    1. You're right about it being different if you grew up expecting to have a large family, but I think I'd hesitate to join an already-made family that large!

      But of course, Ruthy had fallen in love with their father. I'm not sure it mattered how many children he had :)

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    2. LOL! I know what you mean Wendy. 10 kids would scare me off. He'd have to be a pretty awesome guy for me to even look twice that way!

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  2. This sounds like a book I would really enjoy. However, NO, I don't think I could marry a man with 10 children.

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    1. I hope you get a chance to read the book! Thanks for stopping by.

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    2. Thanks for coming by! I had 4 children and they kept me busy. Not sure there is enough of me to go around for 10.

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  3. I feel that it would be hard to hide the fact that a person has 10 little children, and if you loved the man, you would at least attempt to love the children, or at least treat them kindly because they "come with" the person you love.
    I follow by feedburner as well.

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    1. You'll have to read the book to see how Ruthy "discovered" all those children, Connie! And you're right. Levi and his children were a package deal. :)

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    2. Thanks for being a feedburner follower, Connie. Love does cause one to do strange things!

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  4. I admire Ruthy how she took this job and put her all in to it to take care of these children. i honestly could not due it. i have five of my own children and that is plenty for me. Besides I think this was a special family who needed her and she needed them.

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    1. Thanks for coming by. It would have to be a special person to be able to do that.

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    2. I think you hit the nail on the head - this family needed Ruthy and she needed them. :)

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  5. I love my husband but it would have been hard to marry him if he had ten children before I met him! I probably would have not put myself in the situation to be more than friends! I adore children but I do think it would have been a struggle! a_stonecipheratyahoodotcom

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    1. LOL! I know what you mean. Today 10 children is so uncommon. Just the thought makes me break out in a sweat. ;o)

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    2. Oh, but they were such sweet children! How could you NOT fall in love with all of them? AND their father? :)

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  6. Hello Jan, I can sure see the problem this man has with 10 children but then I came from a large family and love all my siblings. I would like to read this story and sure hope to win it. I am rooting for Love to find this couple and the children to feel it spilling around them too.
    thanks for sharing on the blog today. should I win -would prefer paperbook.
    Paula O(kyflo130@yahoo.com)

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    1. Thanks for following my blog, Paula! And you know that when you read the book that you'll fall in love with all 10 children and say well, maybe I could take on ten children. lol.

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    2. I hope you get a chance to read the book, Paula. If you do, be sure to let me know how you liked it!

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  7. I have joined with GFC , like the site...thanks for sharing

    Paula O(kyflo130@yahoo.com)

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  8. My husband is the youngest of 10, his oldest sibling being 20 years older than him . . . even with the differences in age they were a very close family. I cannot imagine having 10 children, we have 3 children, 10 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren. But times are different and family members move all over the country, so naturally are not all that close. I would love to win a copy of this book . . . Amish books are my favorite! jynhoffman@yahoo.com

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    1. Thanks for coming by. I think you hit the nail on the head. Times were different. In the 19th century large families were common. They helped in gardening and farming.

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    2. That's one thing I love about the Amish - it's as if they live in a different century. But the contemporary Amish have a lot to deal with in our modern world, too. Decisions like whether to use cell phones, or bicycles, or for the father to work away from home.... Keeping God first in their lives is the only way for a family to survive, just like it is for us. :)

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  9. Would love to read this book. I don't think I could marry a man with 10 children unless they are well behaved, easy to get along with and do as they are told.
    kmgervais(at)nycap(dot)rr(dot)com

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    1. LOL! with 10 kinds you are bound to get one misbehaving. Thanks for coming by, Karen and good luck!

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    2. Hmmm, I'm trying to imagine a world where 10 children fit your description all at the same time.... :) Like Debbie said, there's bound to be one misbehaving somewhere!

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  10. No, no, no. I only raised one child. Maybe I could have handled 3 or 5, but no way 10. Plenty of parents have done that though.
    I have two nephews that live in Rapid City, SD. Went there for a wedding, so I was in your vicinity.
    josieringer(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hey Martha! I raised four and that wasn't bad but 10? Yikes! Makes me tired just thinking about it.

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    2. I raised four, and would have welcomed a dozen if we could have had them! God made all of us different, didn't they?

      And I hope you enjoyed your visit to Rapid City! We've called this area home for four years and absolutely LOVE it.

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    3. Sorry, that should have said, "God made all of us different, didn't he?" *blushing*

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  11. I could not have handled ten children I did good to handle the two I had!

    mauback55 at gmail dot com

    Thank you for the giveaway!

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    1. I found with my four that they tended to pair up - but the pairs kept changing. So if a couple weren't getting along, they had a couple other siblings to play with instead! It was actually easier than two.

      But raising children, no matter how many you have, is no easy job. It's definitely the most rewarding though, isn't it?

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  12. Hey Melanie. I have a friend who raised 8 children and she helped me coach cheerleading! I don't know how she did it, but she found the time and energy.

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