Monday, June 23, 2014

Annie's Stories by Cindy Thomson ends June 30th


Please welcome Cindy Thomson to my blog this week! It's great to have you here Cindy. Cindy is giving away a copy of her book, Annie's Stories. Be sure to leave a comment about the interview or ask Cindy a question to be entered. Don't forget to leave your email addy and let me know if you are a follower for an extra entry.

Where are you right now (LVR, DR, Bathroom) and what are you wearing? You have to tell the truth.
I’m in the dining room on my laptop. Just took a shower so I’m dressed in a shirt, sleeveless top and flip flops. (Wet hair!)

What is the funniest, strangest, or most interesting thing you have learned when doing research?

That’s not an easy question to answer so I’ll just have to pick one. I wasn’t there specifically for research, but novelists are always soaking in things. My husband and I were in Ireland and I planned to visit someone I’d met online who has some really interesting approaches to gardening. I thought my husband would like to see her property. The woman was very gracious (even made us pancakes because she thought we may have missed that American meal while on our trip.) She was happy to give us a tour of her gardens and tell us what she had planted. But she turned out to be very eccentric. She built her house and decorated it in a very artsy Irish style. Much of what she had had been recycled or re-purposed in some way, which is great but that gives you an idea of her personality. She had never been to America, but had plenty of opinions about us, our government, and our industries. (She obviously spent a lot of time on the internet.) She even asked me if I thought the states would be better off being their own countries! Then as we were leaving she shouted out to us, “Now don’t be putting me into any of your books!” Uh, no promises!

What is something that very few people know about you?

I’m not that mysterious so this is a difficult question. Maybe that I’m not shy when it comes to speaking about something I’m passionate about. I’m a quiet person who prefers to observe before jumping in. That’s why people are continually surprised to learn that I speak in front of groups. I love talking about my writing, genealogy, Irish history…


What is your favorite material item that you own (examples: ipod, Gone with the Wind book, grandmother’s rocking chair)

Hard to pick one. I do treasure the old Smith-Corona typewriter my grandfather used to type letters to my father when he was in WWII.


If you could live in any time period other than the one we live in, past or future, when and where would that be and why?

It’s easy to romanticize this, but the truth is the people of the past often had hard lives and short lifespans. I suppose the future might be good, but who knows? If I had to pick I’d probably pick the era I’ve been writing about, the turn of the twentieth century, because there was so much change going on and so many inventions. It was an exciting time to live. But…the time of the American Revolution would also be interesting. Who wouldn’t like to talk to the Founding Fathers? However, I would not like to be caught in that war, and I’m partial to indoor plumbing. If I could just visit the past and ask questions and then come right back that would suit me best.


If you were writing a book about your life what would the title be?

My son has an answer to this question. He says his would be Now What Have You Learned? J Mine might be Unlocking the Past.


What one novel did you read that made you want to be a part of the story?

Again, I can’t just pick ONE. There have been many but I’ll just mention one. The Light Between the Oceans by M.L. Stedman. It takes place in Australia, much of it on a lonely island where the lighthouse keeper lives. I can’t imagine the vast, incredible natural beauty of that place, and how isolated it is. I would also liked to have intervened when the characters made that fateful decision, but you’ll have to read it to know what I mean.

What is the biggest secret you ever kept (of course it can’t be a secret anymore)?

I’m not big into keeping secrets. I do write about them, though. ;-)


What is the craziest thing you’ve ever done?

That might be the night I spent in a monastery run by French monks in Ireland that practiced silence. They were gracious, but the practice, especially when it came to mealtime and you had to make hand gestures to be understood, was odd for me. I don’t know why I thought that was going to be a good idea.


The year is 1901, the literary sensation The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is taking New York City by storm, and everyone wonders where the next great book will come from. But to Annie Gallagher, stories are more than entertainment—they’re a sweet reminder of her storyteller father. After his death, Annie fled Ireland for the land of dreams, finding work at Hawkins House.

But when a fellow boarder with something to hide is accused of misconduct and authorities threaten to shut down the boardinghouse, Annie fears she may lose her new friends, her housekeeping job . . . and her means of funding her dream: a memorial library to honor her father. Furthermore, the friendly postman shows a little too much interest in Annie—and in her father’s unpublished stories. In fact, he suspects these tales may hold a grand secret.

Though the postman’s intentions seem pure, Annie wants to share her father’s stories on her own terms. Determined to prove herself, Annie must forge her own path to aid her friend and create the future she’s always envisioned . . . where dreams really do come true.

29 comments:

  1. I would love to win your book and get to know your work. If I win, I would read it and share it.
    jrs362 at Hotmail dot com

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  2. I think the turn of the 20th century would have been a very interesting time to live! So many changes going on. But like you I am pretty happy with our modern conveniences and am not sure I would actually enjoy living back then.

    pattymh2000(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. They were all about progress back then, so I don't think they would have opted to live in the past either! ;-)

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  3. I bet it was fun to meet that eccentric Irish lady! I love that she said no to being in one of your books. ;) Sounds like a challenge to me.
    Fun interview! Thanks for sharing with us.
    lattebooks at hotmail dot com
    feedburner follower

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    1. She was too interesting to ignore! ;)

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  4. Those questions and answers were great. Were you in the monastery for research on a book? Your book sounds great and has such a pretty cover. I am a follower. Please enter me.

    sweetdarknectar at gmail dot com

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    1. No, but it sounds like I should have been, and any experience could end up in a future book.

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  5. Sounds like a great read... Love your cover!

    Writer_weaverATyahooDOTcom

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  6. We have the first book in this series in the church library. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to win this book.
    Janet E.
    von1janet(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. That's great to know, Janet! I love that folks have access to it.

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  7. Cindy, I agree with you on having opportunities to visit the past, rather than actually live there. In addition to indoor plumbing, I really love air conditioning in hot, humid weather. I love the time in which Annie's Stories is set. My grandmother was born in 1903 and I always enjoy reading about times in which she lived.
    may_dayzee(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. I do think about my grandmother too, Kay. Mine was born in 1900. What changes they saw in their lifetimes!

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  8. Debbie, I forgot to mention that I follow your blog :)

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  9. I love type writers! That is so cool that you have something like that.
    bookwormgal2011 at yahoo dot com

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    1. I used to use it. The e sticks and my dad told me it always did.

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  10. I LOVED getting to know you Cindy! This interview is FANTASTIC!!! And LOL! BUMMER I REALLY want you to put the Irish lady in one of your books! :D She sounds like a hoot! How odd it would be to have all our states be countries! That's something very interesting to think about though.

    Blessings,
    Amada (pronounced: a.m.a.th.a) Chavez

    amada_chavez{AT}yahoo{DOT}com

    I'm a feedburner follower Debbie!!! :)

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  11. Hi Cindy & Debbie! Thanks for the chance to win what sounds like another awesome book by Cindy! I didn't see it on the cover, but is this another Ellis Island book and/or will there be more!
    *I'm a feedburner follower!
    Kristen Anissa
    kam110476 at gmail dot com

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    1. Yes, this is book two of the Ellis Island series. I hope there will be more. None under contract right now, but if readers express an interest book three will follow. I'll working on it right now!

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  12. Hello Cindy. I would love to win your book about Annie. I love that you have the typewriter that your dad recived letters from his dad while serving in WWll. You see, I had a brother who served in that war. He just turned 89 the 6th of this month. I was a third and fourth grader in Houston at that time and remember how thin gs were. My dad went to work in the Shipyard to serve in that way. Everyone, even women did anything at all to help. I liked the part on your interview about the woman yo visited in Ireland. Especially where she didn't want you to put her in a book and here you are giving her story, BUT not in a book. LOL Please put my name in for the drawing. Debbie I am a follower by Feedburner. Thanks. Maxie > mac262(at)me(dot)com <

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  13. Thanks, Maxie! My dad actually got a scolding from his superior officer for not writing home to his parents. He was only 17.

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  14. Thank you all for stopping by and welcoming Cindy! I know I usually try to respond to each of you but we are in the middle of family crisis with my father breaking his neck and my mom just having part of her lung removed day before yesterday. Thank you all for your great support! Have a great week.

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    1. Oh, my. So sorry, Debbie. Hang in there!

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  15. Looks like an interesting book -thanks for the chance to read it! truckredford(at)gmail(dot)com
    I follow by feedburner too

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  16. Spending a night in a monastery sounds interesting - don't think it would be for me either! I'd really enjoy reading Annie's Stories.
    pbclark(at)netins(dot)net













































    Spending a night in a monastery sounds interesting - but I don't think it would be for me either. Annie's Stories sounds very good and I'd love to read it.
    I am a follower.
    pbclark(at)netins(dot)net



















































































































































































































































































































































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  17. Count me in on this one.....sounds fascinating!

    mauback55 at gmail dot com

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  18. thanks for the chance to read this wonderful novel :)

    karenk
    kmkuka at yahoo dot com

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