Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Blessing of Grandmothers


My grandmother, Delitha was born in 1917 and is 96 years old. She is a wealth of information. We sat out on my front porch swing one day and talked about some of her life as a young child.

She was a little over a year old when the flu epidemic of 1918 hit. Her

mother, Basha Bay, died in that epidemic and seven days later her aunt, Icey May died. My great-grandmother said my grandmother wasn't feeling well the day of her mothers funeral and they feared my grandmother was coming down with the flu. However, if she had the flu it was a mild case. The epidemic left her motherless and fatherless so her grandmother, who wasn't a well woman took her in.

I asked her what her earliest memories were, and I have to say it's funny what the mind

remembers. She remembers at age four going to her aunt Pearl's house and eating beef steak and thinking it tasted better than anything in the world. Her other memory at age four was of her grandmother's cook stove. It was a cast iron type where you put the wood and paper inside to get a fire going to heat the four burners on top.She said they had a small hole next to the burner to stick something in and be able to pull up the burner. She remembers her grandmother sticking her finger in the hole and flipping the burner so fast she didn't get burned.

Grandma at age five was given a cotton sack that hung across her shoulder and down her back to take

out to her uncle's cotton field in Missouri and help pick cotton. She said she remembers it being so hot and at the end of the day they weighed her cotton and paid her ten cents, and she thought that dime was wonderful.

She grew up in an age when horse and buggies were going out but some of her family still had them. She was fortunate to be born when life was starting to get easier. But as I listen to the tales of walking down the street after dark at nine years old to get a bucket of coal to help heat a house I can't help to think how much we take for granted and our children even more so.


 

A child was expected to work in their youth. So many parents today think that if their children pick up their own toys they've done a great days work. Chores are fast becoming a thing of the past. Allowances are earned for nothing more than being their child. But are we really doing our children a favor? When I see what kind of woman my grandmother turned out to be I can't help but wonder how her childhood helped her become the lady she is today.

Until four years ago when she had a stroke she was a busy woman. She retired from GM at sixty-five. Went back to work once more, this time for a real estate, where she worked for several more years. Retired for a year, got bored and went to work in retail until she was eighty-five years old. But don't think she sat around after that. If one of her grandchildren had a project going, be it painting, gardening, lawn work, canning, yardsales, etc. you could bet she'd be there helping. She is a woman who wasn't afraid of work and a woman I am proud to call grandma.




48 comments:

  1. Your grandmother sounds like a very fascinating woman. You are so blessed to still have her with you. Cherish every moment you have with her. I no longer have my parents or grandparents...I guess that is why I try to be as close to my children and grandchildren as possible. We never know when the Lord will call us home. Great post. Thanks for sharing. God bless.

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    1. Thank you Chaplain Debbie. She is an amazing lady. She is my last grandparent. She lived a hard life. I really didn't get into in the post but it is very sad. Once she was 7 or 8 her grandmother couldn't take care of her and she was passed around from home to home and used as a servant. I'm sorry you've lost all your elders. I just can't imagine.

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  2. Forgot my email: debsbunch5[at]jesusanswers[dot]com

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  3. No need to enter me, but this was a a wonderful post. That generation is the greatest. Your grandmother and you sound a lot alike.

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    1. Thank you, Kathy. I would love for you to meet her. Maybe this summer? ;o)

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  4. So sweet of you to share this. I would love to be entered. I so love wood cookstoves.
    Linda Finn
    faithfulacres7@gmail.com

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    1. Hello Linda. Thanks for coming by. I love those old stoves, too. We have 2 old ones. We are getting ready to build and plan to put at least one in the new house.

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  5. She sounds like a wonderful lady! I very much agree about today's generation of children not knowing what work really is. I am afraid of how they will grow up. Both my hubby and I grew up on farms where everyone pitched in and worked hard. We are trying to instill that work ethic in our own children and teaching them to be proud of a good hard days work. I had a grandma just like yours - she was very busy and still went bowling many times a week until she died last year at 90 years old. What a great legacy they leave!
    Susan P
    farmygirl at hotmail dot com
    feedburner follower

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    1. Hey Susan! Wow! Bowling at 90 that is so neat. They do leave so much with us if we will let them. And Good for you! teaching your children a good days work is something to be proud of! As I mentioned in another comment above we are going to build. We bought 22 acres and want a small hobby farm. I may need to get some pointers from you!

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  6. Dear Debbie,
    Bless your Grandmother's heart!
    She sounds like a wonderful and loving woman who needs to write a book of her experiences. Just to think of what she has seen in her lifetime boggles my mind.
    Thanks for entering me in your giveaway.
    Hugs to Grandma from me.
    I am a feedburner follower.
    Janet E.
    von1janet(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hey Janet. Thank you for your kind words. YOu know, I tried to get her to let me write it all down but she wouldn't let me! She said it was a sad life and she didn't want me too. She's a wonderful lady. She prayed our whole family into the Kingdom of God!

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  7. What a wonderful essay on your grandma...and a great heritage,how thankful we should be for our easier lives!!! Thanks for the opportunity to receive all these books, they look fabulous! jelliott53(AT)Hotmail(dot)com I am a feedburner follower

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    1. Hey Jojo. We do live easier lives but sometimes I feel fortunate too that our lives are so much easier. But I wonder if it isn't really the blessing that we think it is. I think the hard work kept people honest and busy and certainly the country was much more moral back then.

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  8. You are right. Children today would not know what to think if they had to work hard like that. I daresay, we would not have the gangs, drugs, and other trouble the children get into today. They would be too tired to do any of that. It is such a shame the way they waste their lives today.

    I am a feedburner follower.

    deamundy@gmail.com

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    1. Deanna, I was just saying that! YOu are so right! You never heard about that kind of thing back in those days. Kids were to busy working to get in trouble. And kids looked forward to school because it was a break from work! LOL

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  9. I love grandmas...thanks for the wonderful reminder of what a blessing they are! truckredford(at)Gmail(dot)com
    I am a feedburner follower

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    1. I do too, Eliza! I hope I can be just half the grandma that mine is!

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  10. Oh, I'd love to have an antique stove like that. lol I am a young grammy of six beautiful children and mother to five daughters.

    Thanks for sharing.
    gahome2mom/gmail/com

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    1. Thank you for coming by! Those stoves are so neat. Wow 5 daughters! I had one and 3 sons. And 6 grandchildren. YOu are blessed! What a lucky lady you are. Good luck in the drawing and thanks again for stopping by!

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  11. Grandmothers are special people, I miss mine so often and thank God for the time I had with her, her wisdom was precious, and more so today when I remember all she taught me.

    Thanks for sharing your story with us too.
    rrwalterAT gmailDOTcom

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    1. Your welcome, Becky. Thank you for coming by. Our grandparents do have so much wisdom. They've seen so much more in their lives than we can imagine. Mine saw horse drawn carriages and now unmanned spaceships to Mars!

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  12. My grandfather lost his first wife in the flu epidemic. It left him with four young boys. My grandmother took their care on and also raised four more children.
    You are right about work being good for a child. Not really hard work, but something to teach them a skill and to know they can accomplish anything. I hope my grandchildren are raised the right way.
    josieringer(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hey Martha. Oh my goodness. I can't imagine a husband losing his wife and having to raise 4 young boys on his own. God bless your grandmother for taking on the job. She must have been a wonderful woman. Yes, I don't believe in child labor, but I think chores build character in children and give them pride in their work and builds integrity.

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  13. I saw your message on the ACFW loop and popped over here. Sweet story about your grandma, Debbie.

    My TBR pile is very high right now, so I'll leave the giveaway for the others. :)

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  14. Thank you for coming by, Susan. I can so relate! MY TBR pile never seems to shrink. Have a great Sunday!

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  15. Wonderful to read about your grandmother! My grandparents have all been gone for years now and I still miss them. There's nothing quite like a loving grandparent.
    twinwillowsfarm at gmail dot com

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  16. Hey Pegg. I've lost 3 of the 4 of mine. My grandmother's husband I really miss. He was a do-it-yourself kind of guy.

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  17. What an inspiration! Thanks for the giveaway! shopgirl152nykiki(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  18. Debbie Lynne,

    I'd give just about anything to be able to sit and talk with my grandma about the old days like you have. She was born in 1876--boggles my mind to think of that. She lived to be 95, so I remember her even though she was already 79 when I was born. But alas she died long before I ever thought of writing books. I'm glad you've got to have yours around for so long.

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    1. Thanks Vickie. It is amazing to hear some of her stories.

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  19. Loved this post, Debbie. You are indeed blessed to still have your grandmother in your life. No need to enter me in the drawing. I just wanted to drop by and read about this fascinating woman.

    And I agree, we are doing our children a disservice by NOT requiring more chores of them. Leads to respect, responsibility, caring for the world around them, and helping others. My children are 4 and 2, and they help with dishes, laundry, and vacuuming, minor yard work, as well as picking up their toys. I did it as a child, so my children will too!

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    1. Good for you, Amber! My grandbaby is 2 and we have her pick her toys up and she helps me empty the dishwasher. Of course right now that is fun. LOL>

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  20. Thanks for sharing!
    Joi Copeland
    booksbyjoiatcopelandclandotcom

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  21. Thank you for hosting this giveaway and for the nice article.

    wfnren(at)aol(dot)com

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  22. Thanks for coming by, Wendy. Good luck!

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  23. Your grandmother sounds like a wonderful lady, Debbie Lynne. Mine passed away several years ago at the age of 96 but I still cherish the stories she told of her youth. She told one of her brother racing in a horse-drawn sleigh - the pictures her stories evoked! Sounds like your grandmother has great stories to tell, too. I'm so grateful our daughter had a chance to know her great-grandmother & also thankful that Gram got to "meet" our son before going home to Heaven. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. P.S. don't enter me in the drawing...I just wanted to thank you for sharing :-)

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    2. Thanks for coming by Tammy. I'd love to have heard that story. sleighs are a fascination of mine.

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  24. My Grandmother lost two children (My uncles) and her husband in that Spanish flu epidemic. My grandfather and one uncle died on the same day. My granmother was left with 10 children to raise on her own. I often ponder how she managed to trudge on. My sister claimed she was grumpy (I was very young when she passed)and I maintain that it was by God's grace she remained sane! We can learn so much from their lives. They were an inspiration to us spoiled folks who take life for granted. Thanks for sharing. I'd love to win the books. I love the Jill Stengl book. It's one of my favorites! Blessings, Zanne Davis

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  25. Hey Zanne. Your grandmother sounds like an amazing woman! Thank you for sharing that. That epidemic took so many lives. My husband's father was a young man during that flu and he said he remembers them stacking the bodies like cords of wood because they couldn't bury them fast enough.

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  26. Becky you won the 5 Heartsongs. I've sent you an email. Congratulations!!

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  27. What a moving tribute to a great lady. May she enter into her rest. Well done, good and faithful servant. Well done. Prayers for you and your family as you mourn her loss.

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  28. I LOVE YOU GRANDMA!

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  29. I LOVE YOU GRANDMA................A.J. CUTLER

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  30. I LOVE YOU GRANDMA! A.J. CUTLER

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