Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Dawn Comes Early by Margaret Brownley ends March 25th



 About Margaret

Thrills, mystery, suspense, romance: Margaret penned it all. Nothing wrong with this—except Margaret happened to be writing for the church newsletter. After making the church picnic read like a Grisham novel, her former pastor took her aside and said, "Maybe God's calling you to write fiction."         
So that’s what Margaret did. She’s now a New York Times bestselling author and a Romance Writers of America RITA finalist with more than 28 novels to her credit.  Her first non-fiction book Grieving God’s Way: the Lasting Path to Hope and Healing has won much critical acclaim.  Look for more of Margaret’s storytelling in A Bride for All Seasons collection (June) and the exciting conclusion to the Brides of Last Chance Ranch series Gunpowder Tea (September). Not bad for someone who flunked 8th grade English.  Just don’t ask her to diagram a sentence.

More Love and Laughter from . . .
Margaret Brownley
Horses to Horsepower
In my new book Waiting for Morning Dr. Caleb Fairbanks drives an automobile he built himself.  The car he calls Bertha has one very bad habit; it backfires.  Thinking she’s being shot at, Molly Hatfield does what any feisty heroine would do; she shoots back.  Not only does this start a cattle stampede but almost gets Caleb killed.
Ah, the automobile. What would we do without it?  Today cars are blamed for everything from global warming to funding terrorism through dependency on oil.  But it wasn’t that long ago that the old gray mare was held responsible for the social and economic ills of the world.
In 1908, it was estimated that New York City alone would save more than a million dollars a year by banning horses from its streets. That’s how much it cost to clean up the tons of manure clogging the roadways each year. 
Horses were also blamed for traffic congestion, traffic deaths, diseases and, of all things, noise pollution.  Hooves clattering on cobblestones were said to aggravate nervous systems.  Even Benjamin Franklin complained about the “thundering of coaches, chariots, chaises, waggons, drays and the whole fraternity of noise” that assailed the ears of Philadelphians.
The first automobiles to drive west were driven by insurance salesmen and land agents.  When a witness in a small Texas town left the courthouse during an important trial, he was followed by the entire courtroom, including jurors, who wanted to see his automobile.

As with all technology, outlaws were quick to see the advantage of automobiles. They could make a quick get-away and the automobile would keep going long after a horse gave out. This left the local sheriff at a disadvantage. 
Then as now, youths were quick to get on the auto band-wagon and many ceased driving the family wagons entirely. Frontier lawmen suddenly found themselves issuing stern warnings, not to outlaws, but to racing youths.
 The automobile was supposed to make the world a safer, saner, quieter and healthier place. It was also thought to be more economical since feeding a horse wasn’t cheap. That’s something to think about the next time you’re stuck in traffic or filling up your gas tank.  But take heart: the safer, quieter, more economical Robot Car is here.



Stop by and say hello and you could win a copy of the first book in the Brides of Last Chance Ranch series Dawn Comes Early.







42 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Debbie, thank you! It's great to be here and to visit with all your readers.

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  2. I would love to win,Enter me!!!
    Thanks for the giveaway and God Bless!!!
    Hello Margaret and Debbie!!!
    Sarah Richmond
    sarahrichmond[dot]12[at]gmail[dot]com
    N.C.

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    1. Hi Sarah! Thank you for dropping by!

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    2. Hello Sarah. Thanks for coming by. so gld you came by.

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  3. Love the tidbit about cars! Very interesting! I loved both of these books but I don't have Dawn Comes Early in book form so I'd love a chance to win-thanks!

    gatorade635(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hi Abbi, I liked writing about those early cars. My favorite scene in the book is when his car backfirs and, thinkings she's being shot at, Molly fires back! Good luck.

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    2. That was one of my favorites too!

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    3. Hey Abbi. Thanks for coming by. Good luck!

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  4. Hey - looks like a great book..enter me!

    truckredford (at) gmail (dot com)

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    1. Hi Eliza, it looks like you're entered. Good luck!

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    2. Throwing your name in the hat now, Eliza!

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  5. Enjoyed the little history lesson on automobiles vs. horses. Thank you for offering a copy of Dawn Comes Early.
    may_dayzee (at) yahoo (dot) com

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    1. Hi Kay, wouldn't those Victorians be shocked if they saw our roads today? Talk about noise and pollution. Thank you for entering and take care.

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    2. Culture shock for sure!!

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    3. Hey Kay. Thanks for coming by. Margaret you're right that would be something for them to see.

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  6. Dear Margaret,
    We have your books in the Church Library. I would love to win, "Dawn Comes Early" to add to our collection.
    Thanks!
    Janet E.
    von1janet(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Hi Library Lady,
      Oh, goody! I love knowing my books are in libraries. Thank you for writing. :)

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    2. Hey Library Lady. Good luck! Thanks so much for coming by. I LOVE libraries. I used to take my boys once week and we'd spend half a day there.

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  7. I would love to win this book by Margaret. I do love Westerns, and have for many, many years. Please enter my name. Thanks. Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

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    1. Hi Maxie, hey, we love western readers! We'll just put your name in that old Stetson and see what happens!

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    2. Hello Maxie. I enjoy westerns too. Good luck!

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  8. Fun article - thanks for the opportunity to win a book!

    bonnieroof60@yahoo.com

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  9. Bonnie, thanks. It was a fun article to write. Good luck!

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  10. Margaret, where can i get your Church newsletters? i bet they were fascinating. And yes, it's funny what we can find to blame for world troubles, besides ourselves! i would love to win! Thanks for the chance!

    mitziUNDERSCOREwanhamATyahooDOTcom

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    1. Throwing your name into the hat, Marianne. I do agree. I bet those are so interesting!

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  11. I have not read any of the books in this series and would really enjoy reading the first one and then on to the others!
    pbclark(at)netins(dot)net

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    1. You're missing a good series! You need to pick one up if you don't win. Throwing your name in now. :o)

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  12. I love, love, love books based on the western side of things!

    missionwife@hotmail.com

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    1. Hey Melody. Hope you are home safe and sound now and enjoying Texas life again. God bless!

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  13. Good evening, Ms. Brownley + Ms. Debbie Lynne!! :)

    I oft wondered what it would be like if we were not as co-dependant upon our cars, and up until I found myself carless, I wouldn't have known quite what to do or what that would involve! Laughs. Ironically, its not as bad as I thought, because it opened up a whole new take on living and life, so I cannot say, that the luxury of autos has rounded out our lives completely, but actually, in a way similiar to the internet + social media has complicated our lives quite a heap! For starters, we sometimes tend to take ordinary things for granted and forget that there is a bit more to rushing here or there, and accomplishing as much as we can cram into an 8 hour day! :) I think as technology evolves as you know it always will, we have to take big steps into finding the balance to live a life well-rounded and full of ordinary joy! :)

    Having said that, I miss being on horse-back something firece! I was a young rider when I began as I was on the verge of middle school when I first learnt to ride, and I had a wicked sweet friendship with a retired throroughbred which of course, is most likely due to why its my favourite breed to this day {aside from Arabians, Mustangs, Paints, & Paso Finos}!! Horse and rider get to enjoy the land and each others' company first and foremost, but what I love about our rich Western history is the co-partnership we had with these beloved stallions and fillies! Including how we used to receive my beloved correspondances! :) :)

    The era of shift from the Old West into the New Age of automobiles is an exciting one! I know a bit about this as my grand-parents and my great-grandmother shared tidbits of the transitions with me, as my great-grandmother lived hinged between the 19th and 20th centuries! And, in Chicago in the early 1900s whilst my grandparents were courting and marrying, they still had wagons delivering fruit, veg, and ice which I know firsthand as it was a family trade!

    I'd be keen to see where your stories take us, as you illuminate these transitions to an era we live in now that is a bit distanced from the life of my grandparents! I wonder if others' grew up hearing the stories that I did!? To where, you nearly felt you were back there, breathing in the hay and dealing with the challenges of 'on time' deliveries?!

    I'm going to bookmark your author website + sign up for your newsletter! :) Love finding new authors who write exciting slices of historical fiction! Great find, Ms. Debbie Lynne! And, much continued success Ms. Brownley!

    inkand-bookaways(at)usa.net
    //Florida

    {ps} Ironically, or not, I can actually nearly hear Mr. Franklin making that declaration! He was a pure hoot and a man who was never afraid to speak his mind or assert his opinions to anyone who would listen! Talk about a fascinating age to live in! :) I am always greatly intriqued by eras that held such triumph statesmen and engaging minds at their forefront of historical reference!

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    1. A note on tea:

      Have you ever drank gunpowder {green} tea!? Whenever I do, I have this imagination that thinks of gunslingers, western ghost townes, stage coaches, train whistling into stations, and the inertia of life in the Old West! Your entitlement of a forthcoming novel perked my attention as I was curious if the 'tea' was the culprit of inspiration behind the title!?

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    2. Jorie girl! How are you? I am so in agreement with you, girlfriend! I have often said how technology which was supposed to simplify our lives has only made it busier because we try to cram more into it because of it! And cars do the same thing. It's easy to run here and there thus stealing hours of our day making us rush around. And speaking of horses. Remington is home and doing well in the pasture. Did I tell you about our harrowing experience with bringing him home. That was the longest drive ever! But he has forgiven us and actually become quite loving. I've never herd of gunpowder tea. But I am a black tea drinker. Not big on green or herb.

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    3. Ms. Debbie Lynne!! :)
      How lovely to read this reply tonight! :) Ahh, your NOT the only one who forgot to say "follower!" of the blog, because it slipped me head when I posted both my comments!! Oyyy. This entire week is a bit of a blur because of how horrid I've felt! :( I even had to stay home from church because the pollen + wind levels were too high, combining with the muggy rainy conditions outside -- I slept 3 hours before I even realised I could 'wake up'! Oyy! Another day I fell asleep at 10a and didn't wake until 5p! Apparently, my allergies are just going to stress me something firece this year! I'm back on local wildflower honey, and I found a new tea that is helping me heaps! I strongely believe in natural medicine, which is why I turn to green + herbal teas whenever I need to help myself heal! :) :) Trust me, its made quite the difference in my life on several issues! And, yes!! You shared a beautiful story of Remington with me -- you will be hearing back from me in length this coming week! I simply needed time to rest & recover!! I curled up with TCM today: Three Coins in the Fountain, Notorious {I adore Grant + Bergman!}, and Dial M for Murder {seriously addicted to anything by Hitch! Minus: Pyscho/Birds}!! Tea and classic films = a relaxing day without my sinuses driving me bonkers! :)

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  14. thanks for the chance to read this wonderful story

    karenk
    kmkuka at yahoo dot com

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  15. This looks like a great series! shopgirl152nykiki(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  16. Once again, I have forgotten to tell everyone to let me know if you follow my blog so you get an extra entry. I'll check on the ones that have posted and give you all the extra entry if you do. If I forget in the future just go ahead and say you are a follower because I ALWAYS give my followers that extra entry. Thanks everyone for being so faithful!

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  17. This book looks like a good one, thank you for the chance to win it. I am also a follower.

    griperang at embarqmail dot com

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  18. Debbie I had already noticed that I forgot to remind you that I am a Feedburner follower on this site. So much for cars would make less noise , etc. Than he horses. We didn't have a buggy when I was young, but we did travel where ever we went in a wagon . i remember seeing some old cars and seemed funny that they started out having a crank on the front to start them. Maxie

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