Monday, January 21, 2013

Choice of Midwife Series book by Laurie Alice Eakes ends January 28th




About Laurie Alice Eakes

“Eakes has a charming way of making her novels come to life without being over the top,” writes Romantic times of  bestselling, award-winning author Laurie Alice Eakes. Since she lay in bed as a child telling herself stories, she has fulfilled her dream of becoming a published author with a dozen books and novellas in print and more on the way. A graduate of Asbury University with a degree in English and French, and  Seton Hill University, with a masters degree in Writing Popular Fiction, she also teaches writing and gives inspirational talks to women’s groups. She lives in Texas with her husband, dogs, and cats, where she enjoys long walks, rainy days, and knitting—rather badly.
Follow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LaurieAEakes
Read excerpts from her books at: http://www.lauriealiceeakes.com



Please welcome my good friend, Laurie Alice Eakes. She is giving a way winners choice of any one of her Midwife books. Ask Laurie Alice a question or tell us about an interesting profession for woman that you know about to be entered in the drawing. 

Debbie Lynne and Laurie Alice with her 
wonderful four legged boy, Nick.

Professional Women

The not particularly amusing joke about working women is what is the oldest profession for women. Long before I grew interested in and began to research their work and lives, I realized that that joke was not only not funny because it’s just vulgar and a dis to women, but because I think it’s just wrong.

I think midwifery was the oldest profession for women. Eve was probably a midwife first for herself and then for other women who came along.

Perhaps this mouthy response that began when I was a child is where my interest in midwives and the historic professions of women began. Perhaps the notion my teachers tried to tell me, that women were suppressed and weren’t allowed to work, made me want to prove them wrong. Yes, I am a bit of a rebel.

Whatever the reason, I began a long-term quest to discover what work women engaged in other than midwifery and prostitution. Admittedly, not many women were allowed to work. Married women had limited control over property or contracts until the end of the nineteenth century in America and later elsewhere. Women didn’t have the vote until the twentieth century except in a handful of states. Yet many women managed to find work inside and outside of the home.

We can start with biblical women.

“She maketh fine linen, and selleth it; and delivereth girdles unto the merchant.”
Proverbs 31: 24 KJV
http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=proverbs%2031&version=KJV

This ideal women is not only a weaver for her family, but she makes enough to sell it, and she sells it to the merchant herself.

“And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment.”
Judges 4:4-5 KJV


62 comments:

  1. Hi Laurie, I haven't, yet, read any of your Midwife series. Will you commit a bit about your research on midwifery? I've always been interested in that profession.
    may_dayzee(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Oh Kay, you are really missing out if you haven't read any of her Midwife series. You have to get them! They are so wonderfully written that you can't put them down!

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  2. I've read the first book in this series, so would live to win the second one!
    How long does it normally take you to write a book, from beginning research to submission?

    Patty
    pattymh2000(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. OH Patty, you have no idea the answer that Laurie Alice is going to give you! I can't wait to see how she answers it. ;o)

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  3. Hi Laurie - What made you write about Midwives? I love reading about them and enjoy when I see books about them.

    griperang at embarqmail dot com

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    1. Angela, Laurie Alice made the profession come alive in her midwife series. Her note to detail is so wonderful.

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  4. I have not read any of this series. How much research did you put into this series?
    campbellamyd at gmail dot com

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    1. Hey Amy, I can't wait to hear what Laurie Alice's answer is. She was having problems with posting but I am hoping we got that taken care of and she'll be answering your questions soon.

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  5. Why do you think midwives are becoming more popular again now?
    pbclark(at)netins(dot)net

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    1. OH great question! Laurie Alice may have a different answer than mine but I'm going to say because midwives are women and a lot of moms like to have women delivering the babies. They also give more flexibility and are usually cheaper. My 2 cents worth, but Laurie Alice probably has some harder data than my thoughts.

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  6. WOW this is GREAT!!! I haven't read any of your books yet Laurie, but all of these are on my NEED TO READ/REVIEW List! :)

    So after your quest what would you have wanted your profession to be if you had lived in or around the time of 19th century?

    Amada (pronounced: a.m.a.th.a) Chavez

    amada_chavez{AT}yahoo{DOT}com

    Exodus 14:14

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    1. Wow is right! What a great question Amanda. I am dying for Laurie Alice to answer this one too!

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  7. Lady in the Mist is the book I am missing from the trilogy!! Would love to win a copy. So... a profession not acknowledged that is by a woman?? Jo in Little Women had it ~ a woman writer with a man's author name on the cover. Kathleen
    lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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    1. Hey Kathleen! Yes, women writers weren't accepted. Isn't that sad? Can you imagine living in a time where you only had a choice of a handful of professions? Yikes?

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  8. I'd love to win a copy of one of Laurie's books. I've been reading a lot of wonderful comments regarding her writing. In my estimation an unusual career for a woman is being a big rig trucker. I've seen a couple of women driving those mammoth trucks, and I can't imagine handling one of those enormous trucks. I think a midwife would be a much preferred position to that! Thanks for featuring Laurie and her books!
    Nancee
    quiltcat26[at]sbcglobal[dot]net

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    1. LOL! Nancee, I agree I think being a midwife would be far better than driving one of those trucks, but some women love doing that. ;o)

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  9. Hi ladies! What a great post.
    My daughter-in-law is opting for a midwife to deliver my first grandchild. I am excited and anxious all at once!
    I imagine a time-honored profession for women is baking and cooking. And laundering. One of my heroines is an army laundress, and it was a respectable if not grueling job.
    I loved the first two in the series and very much look forward to reading the third.

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    1. Hey girlfriend! I'm so excited! We are going to be grandma's within weeks of each other!

      And I want to say that your WHITE WASH BRIDE story is awesome! I can't wait for it to get published!!!

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  10. I have read the first two books in this series. I loved them both. I even read them out loud to my husband during our evening reading time. He enjoyed them too! I would dearly love to get to read the third one in this series. It is an amazing series.
    Thanks for all the effort you went to to research this series. They truly show your effort.
    Shirley
    beekeeper5(at)bellsouth(dot)net

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    1. Awe, Shirley, that is so sweet of you to read those to your hubby. I bet he really appreciated it. Good luck on winning!

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  11. thanks for the chance to read one of laurie's novels :)

    karenk
    kmkuka at yahoo dot com

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  12. I would love to win one of these books. My granddaughter just had her last baby using a Midwife, and also, the first. She has 5 children. Interesting profession. Course, it's an age old one! Everyone says they are good. Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

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  13. My deepest apologies for not answering your wonderful questions sooner. I was away from any computer all day yesterday, out with my husband exploring this lovely new city to which we have recently moved.

    I'll answer in a few posts to keep them short.

    For the lady who asked about researching for the midwives, I answer that question in depth here: http://coffeecupsandcamisoles.blogspot.com today. Let me summarize here in saying I read a lot of original materials like books published hundreds of years ago and obituaries in old newspapers.

    Regarding more about midwives, I have written a lot of posts about them, and it's probably time I wrote some more. Stay tuned to Debbie Lynne's posts. Many of us are starting another blog, and I will be posting some articles about midwives and their role in history there. Also on my own blog http://www.lauriealiceeakes.com/blog

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  14. Patty, I have taken as long as seven months--Heart's Safe Passage--to 11 days, The Carpenter's Inheritance, to write a book. Generally, Ilike three months. I am in the blessed position to be able to write full-time.

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  15. Angela, I got interested in midwives when working for a chiropracter who also rented space in his office to a midwife. She was a fascinating lady. I started reading about them, talking to a couple more, did a project on them for a history of medicine class I was taking, then another course...

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  16. I researched the topic for about four months, reading probably twenty books and countless articles, old newspapers, old books, diaries... It's more about the women themselves adnd their role in society than about the actual practice of midwifery.

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  17. In England, midwives are the norm for delivery. Frankly, they're more attentive and less expensive. Two of my niece's three children were born with midwives and at home. The other was premature, so had to be in a hospital.

    I think ladies like midwives because it's just more personal.

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  18. Amada, that is a fabulous question, and II suspect I'd still be a writer. LOL

    Yes, many writers used male names because they got more respect. Many others put their own names on the cover. Mrs. Radcliffe, for example. I'm pretty sure the Brontes did also, but need to look into that. George Eliot was really Marianne Evans.

    So I expect I'd still have been a writer.

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  19. Kathleen, I'm sorry you're missing Lady. Lots more chances to win it coming up, so keep looking at Twitter or or Facebook.

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  20. Nancee, you are so right. I don't know how they handle big rigs either. I kenw a woman who weight about 100 pounds who drove a logging truck. Diana Brantmeyer (SP) has a book about a female trucker. It's great. I love her, can just never spell her name right.

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  21. Shirley, that's wonderful about your husband reading my books, too. My own husband has never read a whole one of my books, just bits and pieces, but he helps a lot with brainstorming and research when the law is involved.

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  22. Kathy M, thank you for stopping by. Traditional jobs for women do date back thousands of years. Interesting laundress was respectable by the Civil War. In the Napoleonic Wars, about which I know more, it was kind of a euphemism for other work of army followers, though they did do laundry as well.

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  23. Karen, thankyou for stopping by. I hope you can win, too, you are such a faithful follower, and I really appreciate you.

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  24. Thank you all for stopping by. I hope you keep visiting Debbie Lynne's blog she works so hard on, and the new one coming up with I think 30 or so authors, many of whom you will recognize. I am on http://coffeecupsandcamisoles.blogspot.com today for more chances to win.

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  25. Hello Ladies, I have not read this series yet but know they would be good coming from this author. I think midwives verses drs delivering babies women would be more comfortable with a woman present and helping.
    women working today have many jobs that they would not have had years ago, I have a great neice who works with DOT(dept of transportation) hard hat and all out on the roads...not my kind of job but if she likes it and can do it then it should be available I am thinking.
    thanks for sharing your books.
    Paula O(kyflo130@yahoo.com)

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    1. Hey Paula, I have a friend who is the sweetest and she is such a girly girl and she does the same thing! She works huge equipment and loves it. YOu'd never think that when you see her in church!

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  26. Sound like an interesting series....I agree with Paula O , women are more comfortable with a woman present and helping during delivery....I had a midwife helping the doctor for my second child's birth and I had a woman OB for my fifth child's birth. My birth experience with my fifth child was amazing....that was the only baby that I held the second he was born, umbilical cord attached and all; and it was an awesome feeling! It seems that the women have more insight than the men in situations like these.

    seventysevensusieq[at]yahoo[dot]com

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    1. You would think that as private as people were back in the earlier centuries that men never would have delivered another woman's baby. I mean you'd have thought that the husbands would have objected. Just a thought.

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  27. I have not read this series yet and oh it would be great to win this!
    I do not have a question..but did find out about a profession I had not heard of....in the hospital of all places. I went in to have my son..and was offered dulahs (not sure of the spelling)I was told...they massage you during contractions, help you with positions for pain etc. I politely said no...I am not one for strangers touching me..lol. They begged me to give them a try as it was something new and they needed women to give reviews of their work. So I said okay. I am so glad I did. These women were such a blessing and actually the massaging helped so much. I was afraid I would bite their heads of...from stories I had heard from preg women....but they were so comforting. Has anyone else heard of this job? I am sure the work close with midwives as well...actually one of them was a midwife.
    Thanks for this chance...my e-mail is: sunydey26@aol.com

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    1. Wow Johnette,

      I've never heard of those. I'll have to tell my daughter about it. I sure could have used one back when I had my kids!

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  28. i would love to win
    Jackie ramsdell
    joyofchrist777@gmail.com

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  29. I have nothing against midwives, but my daughter who is a nurse of 25 yrs in labor/delivery says there is way too much risk involved for at home births. Maybe midwives have hospital priviledges? My children were all born in the hospital and so were all of my grandchildren. Safe births with beautiful babies MUST be the goal no matter who delivers them.

    Thank you for the chance to win one of these books.
    gpk1946@tmail.com

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    1. Yes, Midwives deliver in hospitals today. My doctor office has 3 midwives and the way it works is the midwife delivers but if complications arise a doctor is on call to come in and take over.

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  30. I just read the 3rd one and really liked it, but haven't read the first 2 yet. When did doctors become more popular than midwives for delivering babies? shopgirl152nykiki(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Hey Veronica,

      Oh you'll love #2! It is fantastic. Good luck!

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  31. I read the first and really loved it! Thank you for this great series, Laurie! And thank you for this giveaway. :)

    Question: What do you think was the biggest challenge for midwives at the cusp of the transition from midwives to doctors?

    Email: inspiringdaring (at) yahoo (dot) com

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    1. Hey Rachelle,

      I love Laurie Alices midwives series. She has put so much research into them. REally opens a persons eyes to the way things were for them.

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  32. I have commented, but forgot to ask a question. Laurie, have you used a midwife or known someone who did? When my granddaughter used one for 2 babies, one in CA., and one here in TX. there was a doctor she could call if something went wrong This was a safety net. But, all went well. I did get to hold my 3rd baby right away and see her head before she was born, but I had a reg. doctor, but was too late for the. knock out meds. Was nice to not be woozy tho. Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

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    1. Yes, the midwives today do have doctors for back ups. I think that is so important. My daughter went into labor and the midwife was on call they gave her the choice of midwife or call in the doctor. She said the midwife would be okay. But she did have complications so the doctor came in and took over. I do have a healthy, sweet grandbaby.

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  33. Laurie, my question is have you ever been present when a midwife delivered a baby? I missed my chance when my granddaughter had hers because I had no way to get to her home.
    Maxie mac262(at)me(dot)com

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  34. I was a correctional officer in a women's prison - over 40 years ago,an interesting & eye-opening experience!

    Thanks for the opportunity to win a book!

    bonnieroof60@yahoo.com

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    1. Wow! I have a friend who was a correctional officer. I can't imagine! I'd be too intimidated. I'm in awe of you ladies.

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  35. Please enter me to win - you know a love your books as I have reviewed those I have read. God bless and annoint you as you write.
    jrs362 at hotmail dot com

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    1. Thanks for coming by. I love Laurie Alice's books too! She's an amazing writer and woman.

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  36. I think an interesting profession for a woman is a building contractor. I don't think many women would enter that profession. Of course I also think it would be neat if a woman could be in the NFL as a kicker or something.


    bluegrassbirdie at gmail dotcom

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    1. LOL! I think I'm a bit of a chauvinist. I still think there are some things that should be just for men. I don't have a problem with women kickers but I think it should be on a women football team. Now a contractor, I bet a woman can give some great ideas to people wanting to build homes. :o)

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  37. I would have to ask about the wonderful book covers! As an author, did you have a lot of input in the design?

    My mom read the first two Midwife books and raved about them! Thanks for the chance to win!

    jafuchi7[at]hawaii[dot]edu

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    1. Your mom was right on the mark with raving about this series. And the covers...Oh my goodness. They are so gorgeous. Her art department really does an outstanding job.

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  38. My apologies for not stopping by sooner. Something happened to my DSL lines late last week, and it didn't get fixed until late last night, and isn't quite fixed, but I can muddle through with partial internet service--about as slow as dial-up.

    Someone asked about the cover designs... I gave them vague ideas of what was in my head, and the wonderful art department at Revell ran with it. Some people think the cover to Heart's Safe Passage is too dark, but it's just right for the story--sea and storms. Someone else didn't like the ladies' hair being down, but that works int he story, too. I can't imagine keeping one's hair up in some of the antics I have the characters perform. :-)

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  39. I am afraid I have never been present during a delivery at all, a definite miss in my research and life experience. I just talked to a lot of women who had had babies and read a great deal.

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  40. I read and reviewed Choices of the Heart and really enjoyed it. I would love to have the other two in this series. Once I read them, I'd pass them along to the Alamance Christian School library.

    godleyv[at]yahool {dot}com

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