Tuesday, October 16, 2012

$10 Amazon Gift Card to buy A Flight of Fancy from Laurie Alice Eakes


“Eakes has a charming way of making her novels come to life without being over the top,” writes Romantic times of bestselling, award-winning author Laurie Alice Eakes. Since she lay in bed as a child telling herself stories, she has fulfilled her dream of becoming a published author with a dozen books and novellas in print and more on the way. A graduate of Seton Hill University’s Writing Popular Fiction graduate program, she also teaches writing and gives inspirational talks to women’s groups. She lives in Texas with her husband, dogs, and cats.
Follow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LaurieAEakes
Read excerpts from her books at: http://www.lauriealiceeakes.com

Laurie Alice Eakes has generously offered to giveaway a $10 Amazon gift card. To be entered in this giveaway leave a comment or ask a question ABOUT the article Laurie Alice has written. As a good friend of Laurie Alice I'm going to ask that you use the gift card to buy one of her FABULOUS books! I promise you that you will be glad you did!

1812:  A Turning Point in British History

For those of you who don’t know me, the Regency, especially the year 1812, fascinates me. This post discusses why I have chosen this era as my main focus of historic study and setting for my novels.

For those of us emersed in the Regency, the year 1812 holds numerous significant incidents--incidents that set history on a course from the old world and into the new. Power changed hands in government and wars, the Industrial Revolution dug in its heels, and Great Britain, for all it became the most far-flung empire in history, began to receive its first glimpse of a shocking truth—it would not always rule the waves.

By 1811, few people denied that the king was permanently mad and could no longer be head of state. The Regency bill passed making his eldest son, also a George, the Prince Regent, or the head of the government. The king, however, still showed enough glimpses of restoration to health that “Prinney” didn’t assume full powers of his role until 1812.

A gamester and profligate spender, the Prince Regent was forever petitioning Parliament for money. This placed him in the power of Parliament and the role of royalty in actually running the government of the kingdom began to diminish.

While Prinney assumed his role as head of Great Britain, a man known as Captain Ludd assumed a different kind of leadership role mostly in the north. The Luddite Rebellion fills books it is such a complex subject, a small war that ultimately took soldiers into Nottingham and York and Lancashire to put it down. Many men died.

The simplest way to explain the Luddite Rebellion is that the weavers, mostly those making stockings, couldn’t make a living. They usually had to rent their looms, the prices for their products were controlled, and they couldn’t change a thing. The Industrial Revolution was bringing in steam looms, machines that were too much competition. So the Luddites started smashing up looms and not letting people work. They sabotaged the industrial looms and spinning machines. Violence reigned powerfully for several months and took about a year to put down in full.

A way of life was coming to an end. The cottage industry of weaving with one or maybe three looms at home was no longer viable in a world quickly becoming mechanized through steam power.

May 11, 1812 saw an horrendous incident when a man stormed into Parliament and shot the prime minister in front of witnesses. Many thought this a French plot, but it was a disturbed individual who thought he hadn’t been served justly by the government. Although the consequences of this assassination weren’t to be known for many years, it brought in a different government that delayed necessary reforms in laws and taxation that would have happened sooner had Perceval lived.

On a brighter note, the war with France, that had been dragging on for nearly twenty years and not going all that well for Great Britain, finally took a turn for the better. Arthur Welsley, AKA Wellington, won the Battle of Salamanca in Spain and the tide was turning against the French at last. Of course, Napoleon didn’t help himself by invading Russia. Tremendously weakened his forces and, I think had a damaging psychological effect on the French people. The emperor was no longer invincible.

Finally for the purposes of this article, is the War of 1812, as it is known in the United States. In England, it’s a blip on the radar, not even taught in advanced history classes. I once laid out some facts about it to a British friend who said I had to be mistaken. In no way could this fledgling country with about eighteen naval vaessels, none great, have beaten down the most powerful maritime power the world had known.

But it happened. Great Britain was impressing American men because the war with France had so decimated Britain’s supply. On the smallest pretext, English naval personnel boarded American ships and took away anyone they could pretend was really English and didn’t’ care about the rest. They also tried to tell the United States where and with whom it could trade. The U.S. said, “Uh, no way, you don’t rule us any more,” and this little, fledgling nation did as it pleased. The U.S. declared war in June, which was kind of stupid, rather like a domestic tabby taking on a Siberian tiger.

But the United States had its privateers. It built the best small, fast, and maneuverable vessels in the world. It armed them and ripped apart the British merchant fleet, taking hundreds of merchantmen until the merchants put pressure on Parliament and the United States signed the Treaty of Ghent on Christmas Eve 1814 and got everything it wanted, including the Northwest Territory. Interestingly, the land battles mostly took place in Michigan and Canada, and the Americans did not show well. And we must not forget to mention that the British burned the U.S. national capital, usually the point at which a country surrenders.

Britain faced the fact that she could be defeated on the high seas. Although we had a long way to go to be as powerful as England in the maritime realm, we showed our claws and made this powerful nation back down. To be fair to Great Britain, they were a bit preoccupied with France.

The Regency is a fascinating turning point in history. 1812 may have the most collective number of those turns of any year of this short but significant time period.

My recent release, A Flight of Fancy, focuses on many fascinating events occurring in 1812—the rise of the popularity and experimentation with mechanical devices like ballooning, as well as the Luddite rebellion and what it meant to the British artisan class. Amidst these historic events, I set a yougn couple dealing with guilt, emotional pain, and their struggles to find their relationship with the Lord in order to heal their own hearts and their love for one another.

 Cassandra Bainbridge has twice set aside her scholarly pursuits--once for the London Season and once for her wedding preparations. Love seems a wonderful alternative to study, until disaster strikes. When an accident brings an end to her betrothal, she heads for the country to recover from both her injuries and her broken heart. There she pursues her love for ballooning and envisions a future for herself as a daring aeronaut. But when her former fiancé slips back into her life, will she have to choose between him and her dream?

Filled with the mystique of London society and the charming beauty of the English countryside, A Flight of Fancy explores what it means to find the true source of happiness and love amid the distractions of life. Readers will love the next installment in this rousing Regency series from accomplished author Laurie Alice Eakes.
DOUBLE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING by following my blog with Powered by FEEDBURNER on the right, and don't miss any giveaways (the button with the flame). If you already follow my blog go ahead and follow by FEEDBURNER so you can be entered twice. If you're not getting an email telling you I have a new giveaway you're not following through Feedburner. Just mention that you follow through Feedburner when you leave a comment with each giveaway and you'll be entered twice.
Be sure to leave your email address. Please check your junk mail on and the day after the drawing. I've had to redraw because of no responses. Subject box will have: winner of (book title). I'll email the winner and they'll have seven days to respond. If I don't hear back I'll draw another name. USA shipping only. Thanks so much and please stop back again! Drawing will be held Monday, October 22nd, 8:00 A.M. EST. Offer void where prohibited. Odds of winning vary due to the number of entrants

38 comments:

  1. Please enter me! I'd love to read something by Laurie...her book covers are always so pretty! :)

    charityu.austenite[at]gmail[dot]com

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  2. I would LOVE to buy Flight of Fancy! I've wanted it for a while now!

    Amada (pronounced: a.m.a.th.a) Chavez

    amada_chavez[AT]yahoo[DOT]com

    Exodus 14:14

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  3. Hey Amanda and Charity. Thanks for coming by! don't forget to either ask Laurie Alice a question about her article or comment on it so you can be entered.

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  4. Hi, Debbie Lynne and Laurie Alice! What a wonderful article on British and American history circa 1812! As you both know, I LOVE history. I was always a little foggy about the Prince Regent period in Britain and how that all came about. You laid it all out so beautifully, Laurie Alice, clearing up a lot of things for me. I learned a lot today! As for your new book, Flight of Fancy has entirely captured my fancy!(lame pun intended, LOL)Can't wait to read the book, and a $10. gift card to pay for it would make the experience even sweeter. So please sign me up for the drawing, but either way I'm excited about taking that "Flight of Fancy!"

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    1. Hey Ramona!!! Thanks for coming by! It is a fascinating time period. Love history!

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  5. I had no idea how much happened during the Regency. Thanks for sharing some historical tidbits so we can all be fasinated with the regency period too

    fencingromein at hotmail dot com

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    1. Hey Shannon, Thanks for coming by! Laurie Alice has so much historical knowledge in that head of hers. She is amazing!

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  6. Wow! I've just had a history lesson. I learned a lot by reading this post. I use to live in Michigan and didn't realize during that time period that land battles took place there. Fascinating!

    I would love to win a copy of your book, Flight of Fancy.

    Thanks again for such an interesting post.

    Blessings!
    Judy
    sweetpea.judy(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Thanks for coming by Judy. I know Laurie Alice is a wealth of knowledge! Where did you live in Michigan?

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  7. I love historical fiction and would love to win the gift card !
    likesmusic2@consolidated.net

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  8. Thanks for the article and giveaway Laurie Alice. It's very interesting looking back to see the different points of view in which we learn about history. Not something I had ever really thought about before!

    Patty
    pattymh2000(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    Replies
    1. Hey Patty and Debbie, thanks for coming by. It's interesting how much history we don't know about.

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  9. A very interesting post! One of the things I love about historical fiction is the view we get of daily life in another time period. The Regency period certainly offers a wonderfully varied spectrum of choices for novel settings. This one sounds intriguing.
    By the way I thoroughly enjoyed Laurie Alice's Midwife series. A view of this time period from an American point of view.
    Shirley
    beekeeper5(at)bellsouth(dot)net

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    1. Hey Shirley. Oh I did too. I love her midwife series. She's a master of drawing you into the story. Can't wait for her next!

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  10. Enter me! Regency is my favorite era to read :)
    I'm a follower through Feedburner.
    homesteading[at]charter[dot]net

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  11. sounds like a great idea, would love to read.

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  12. Ooh! I'd love to buy this book! Regency is one of my favorite time periods to read and the article was very interesting.

    I follow via Feedburner

    ecriggs1990(at)aol(dot)com

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  13. Please enter me! I would love to win this book... looks SO interesting! :)

    ladettek[at]gmail[dot[com


    ps... I follow thru feed burner

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    Replies
    1. Hey Anne, Pat, Liz, and Ladette. Thanks for coming by and for following my blog. Laurie Alice has so many wonderful books out there! Check them all out.

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  14. Thanks to MaryLu Tyndall, I love this era. Your book sounds great and I believe I would learn even more about the year 1812, including the war! I would love to win it. Please enter me.
    debsbunch5@jesusanswers.com

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    1. Hey Chaplain Debbie, Yes, if Laurie Alice wrote it you would definitely learn boo koo's more from reading it. Her stories are saturated in historic detail.

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  15. Oh, I know the prize is a gift card. I would definitely use the card to buy the book. :)

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  16. Her books sound great. Thanks for having the giveaway.

    harnessrose(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  17. I'd never heard of the Luddite rebellion before now! So interesting!! Thanks for writing the article!

    I followed you on FeedBurner!!

    marissamehresman(at)aol(dot)com

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    1. I had but I'd be willing to bet it was from Laurie Alice. LOL. Thanks for being a FB follower.

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  18. thanks for the chance to read this wonderful story

    i'm a follower, too

    karenk
    kmkuka at yahoo dot com

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  19. Looks like a good book. I am a follower of you with FeedBurner. Please enter me in this contest, for two chances. Maxie ( mac262@me.com )

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    1. Thanks for coming by Maxie and Karen! And for being a FeedBurner follower!

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  20. I really enjoyed the history lesson on the Regency period. I became a follower on feedburner. Thank you!
    may_dayzee(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it, Kay! Thanks for being a feed burner follower.

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  21. I've been wanting to read this book! And it was so cool to learn more about 1812! I follow by feedburner!
    gatorade635(at)gmail(dot)com

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  22. Thank you all for stopping by. I see my previous comment didn't go through. Ugh.

    I didn't even get into the spiritual renewal going on at this time, not to mention the serious stirrings of social reform.

    The decadence of the eighteenth century was falling away, but Regencypeople weren't quite as uptight as the Victorians became--not as uptight and hypocritical. But that's another post. :-)

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  23. Sorry you lost your comment. Isn't that frustrating?

    I'd love to read a comparison of the Regency vs. Victorian periods.

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  24. Thanks for sharing this article. I was astounded to learn that in England the War of 1812 is not even taught in advanced history classes!

    Jes
    jswaks at gmail dot com

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    1. Follow your blog through Feedburner.

      Jes
      jswaks at gmail dot com

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    2. Hey Jes, thanks for coming by and for following via feedburner. Good luck!

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  25. This looks like an interesting book! I follow through feedburner and google. shopgirl152nykiki@yahoo.com

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