Thursday, June 28, 2012

Bees in the Butterfly Garden by Maureen Lang Ends July 4th


 Maureen Lang writes stories inspired by a love of history and romance. An avid reader herself, she’s figured out a way to write the stories she feels like reading. Maureen’s Inspirationals have earned various writing distinctions as a finalist for the Rita, Christy and Carol Awards. In addition to investigating various eras in history (such as Victorian England, First World War, and America’s Gilded Age) Maureen loves taking research trips to get a feel for the settings of her novels. She lives in the Chicago area with her husband, children, and Labrador retriever.

Welcome to my blog Maureen. It's nice to have you on here. Maureen has generously offered to give away a copy of her book, Bees in the Butterfly Garden. To be entered answer the question, Do you know any interesting historical facts? or leave a comment. As always don't forget to leave your email addy so I can contact you if you win, and tell me if you are a follower so you get that second entry. Good luck and enjoy the interview.   
 
Where are you right now (LVR, DR, Bathroom) and what are you wearing? You have to tell the truth.
Nothing too exciting, just capris and a cotton flowered shirt. I don’t normally sit down to the computer until after I get my handicapped son off to school or summer day camp, so since I have to be seen in public first, I’m usually decent by the time I start working. Sorry to have such a boring answer to this one, but it does remind me of a “Come As You Are Party” that my sister’s church once hosted. Everyone who was invited was given the name and phone number of someone else on the list. When that person called, they had to come to the party dressed in whatever they were wearing when they picked up the phone. Needless to say, there were lots of calls made really early or really late in the day, so a number of people had to come in their PJs. I wasn’t there, but it sounded like fun!

What is the funniest, strangest, or most interesting thing you have learned when doing research?
Oh, my goodness, it would be hard to find just one. I love doing research, because I find so much material for my books that way. In the project I’m working on now that set in Denver 1887, I learned prostitutes could go to the druggist and for ten cents buy enough morphine to kill herself. Or she could swallow a bichloride tablet that was normally used as a douche chemical (which sounds like a horrible death, since it’s an acid that would basically eat her from the inside out). Nothing funny about any of that, of course; I found it so sad that women could so easily and cheaply end their own life.

What one thing on your writing journey influenced your work the most?
Reading. I love a book that captures my attention and gives me the aspiration to write better.

If you could work with any author who would you choose?
In a sense I already do. My critique partner is Siri Mitchell, whose work I absolutely love. We regularly exchange ideas and try improving one another’s work, so it’s been a great blessing to both of us.

When writing, what is the part of the story you enjoy writing the most?
I love writing toward the end of my novels. Not the actual end, but at about the fourth quarter spot. Everything – hopefully – is really coming together, the action is building, and I can hardly wait to tie it all up.

What is a typical working day for you? Where and when do you write? Do you set goals?
I write as soon as my sons are off to school. My oldest son, 17, has Fragile X Syndrome, and because of that he functions like a two-year-old. Needless to say, when he’s home I don’t get much time at the computer (imagine a two year old with the reach of a 17 year old!). So my working day starts when he’s either at school or, during the summer for five weeks, at day camp. This quiet time typically lasts about 5 hours, between shorter school days and transportation issues, so the time goes quickly. I’m a terrible in-a-rut kind of writer, meaning I prefer sitting at my own desk with my own keyboard (not a laptop) in my own chair. As little noise in the background as possible. Then I can write unhindered! I do set rather vague goals—I like to be halfway done with my project by halfway to the deadline. If I don’t see t hat happening, I go into panic mode and my husband takes on more care-giving responsibility on the weekends so I can write, and instead of going for a brisk walk before anyone else is up I might sit down to the computer very early in the day. I’ve also been known to write at night, but only when absolutely necessary, since I’m a morning person.

If you could have written any piece of literature in history, be it books, speech, poetry, what piece would you want to say Written By Authors Name here
My absolute favorite book is Peace Like A River by Leif Enger. I’d love to have written that! Either that or The Gettysburg Address. That speech brings tears to my eyes.

What is your favorite material item that you own (examples: ipod, Gone with the Wind book, grandmother’s rocking chair)
I’d have to say it’s a ring that used to belong to my grandmother. It’s a manufactured Alexandrite so it’s worth only a tiny fraction of what it would be worth if it were real, but it’s still lovely—and it holds fond memories for me of the days my grandmother wore it.

Thanks very much for having me!


 Raised in an exclusive boarding school among Fifth Avenue’s finest, Meg Davenport has all she’s ever needed . . . but none of the things she’s wanted most, like family, or dreams of a future that includes anything other than finding a suitable match. So when her distant father dies, she seizes the chance to throw etiquette aside and do as she pleases. Especially when she learns that John Davenport wasn’t the wealthy businessman she thought, but one of the Gilded Age’s most talented thieves.

Poised to lead those loyal to Meg’s father, Ian Maguire knows the last thing his mentor would have wanted is for his beloved daughter to follow in his footsteps. Yet Meg is determined, and her connections to one of New York’s wealthiest families could help Ian pull off his biggest heist yet. But are they both in over their heads? And in trying to gain everything, will they end up losing it all?

DOUBLE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING by following my blog with Powered by FEEDBURNER on the right, and don't miss any giveaways (the button with the flame). If you already follow my blog go ahead and follow by FEEDBURNER so you can be entered twice. If you're not getting an email telling you I have a new giveaway you're not following through Feedburner. Just mention that you follow through Feedburner when you leave a comment with each giveaway and you'll be entered twice.
Be sure to leave your email address. Please check your junk mail on and the day after the drawing. I've had to redraw because of no responses. Subject box will have: winner of (book title). I'll email the winner and they'll have seven days to respond. If I don't hear back I'll draw another name. USA shipping only. Thanks so much and please stop back again! Drawing will be held Monday,  June 10th . Offer void where prohibited. Odds of winning vary due to the number of entrants.

52 comments:

  1. An interesting historical fact... I read lots of historical fiction, so I'm sure there has been stuff I've come across in reading that was interesting, but one thing I remember that I learned recently, that I thought was very interesting was that Winston Churchill's mother was an American!

    Please enter me in the drawing for this book.

    I also follow via feedburner.

    Patty
    pattymh2000(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. Wow Patty! That is a very cool fact. Who would have thought!

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  2. History repeats itself if we don't learn by it ~*~ what to do and what not to do! Advance results are shown, so take heed or eagerly go for it.
    lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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  3. I see my little window with the brown hearts hanging down up there ~*~ Google Friend Connect follower!
    lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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  4. I follow by Feedburner and receive e-mails of your posts! Kathleen
    lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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  5. I get a notice through Fiction Addiction Fix and have my very own Debbie Lynn ~*~ Kathleen
    lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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  6. Beautiful cover! We just visited a Butterfly Garden and this reminds me of that. Love to read this.
    pbclark(at)netins(dot)net

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    1. I've never visited one. It sounds like fun.

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  7. Subscriber.
    pbclark(at)netins(dot)net

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  8. Interesting history lesson. You wonder how many women actually used the morphine or biochloride especially among those who were forced into the life because of economic reasons or by the hands of others. Love the premise for the story.

    Tina Pinson

    tina_pinson(at)yahoo(dot)

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    1. I know. that was a really sad fact. And for them to come back into society was pretty hard. People were pretty unforgiving about the life style.

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  9. Nice interview, ladies. This book sounds great. I'd love to be entered in the drawing. shollaway2008(at)gmail(dot)com.

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    1. Hey Susie, Throwing your name in the hat now!

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  10. That is so sad about the ladies of the evening. I'm researching that time period and it was a hard life.
    Diana
    DLBrandmeyer @ gmail.com

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    1. I think what makes this even sadder is that they really felt there was no way out. They were tied to it just like women are today. And if they could escape no one would accept them.

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  11. I just wanted to pop in and say thanks again to Debbie Lynne for hosting me! I'm always so amazed at the variety of fun questions that come with blog visits. They're among my favorite promotional activities! So thanks for making this fun, Debbie, and I appreciate everyone who visits. :-)

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    Replies
    1. Maureen, I'm so glad to have you here! These ladies come up with some good stuff.

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  12. enjoyed the interview,,,,,the book sounds fun and would love to win it....please enter my name in the drawing....thanks!

    seventysevensusieq[at]yahoo[dot]com

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    1. Throwing your name in the hat too, Susie.

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  13. Great interview, Maureen! I've read all your books and I'm looking forward to reading your new one as well. I love your cover and the time period. It would be great to win a copy!

    caralynnjames@yahoo dot com

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    1. Thanks for stopping by Cara Lynn. The cover on this one is just beautiful! Good luck!

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  14. Sounds like a great book! I'd love to win a copy. Thanks for the opportunity! I'm a GFC and feedburner follower. :-)

    gwen[dot]gage[at]gmail[dot]com

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    1. Good luck Gwendolyn. And thank you for following!

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  15. Wow, that is so sad about the morphine fact... Please drop my name in the hat.

    Writer_weaverATyahooDOTcom

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  16. Great Interview, thank you. I would love to be included in the Giveaway.
    I just learned that Slavery in the US started way back in the 1600rds, very interesting.


    ingrids62448(at)yahoo(dot)com

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    1. It was around a long time before things changed.

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  17. a great posting...thanks for the chance to read this beautiful story ;)

    karenk
    kmkuka at yahoo dot com

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  18. This is a great interview. Maureen's books are on my "want to read" list. I think it's interesting her critique partner is Siri Mitchell. I have read several of Siri's books and enjoyed them very much.
    I follow this blog by e-mail subscription.Thanks for the extra entry. I'd love to win a copy of Bees in the Butterfly Garden. It has a lovely cover and an intriguing title.

    pmk56[at]sbcglobal[dot]net

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    1. Hey Pam thanks for following my blog. love to throw in the extra entries for my followers!

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  19. Sounds like a good read and the cover is gorgeous!

    I follow via GFC.
    I follow via Feedburner.

    ecriggs1990(at)aol(dot)com

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  20. This was such an interesting interview! I've enjoyed a few of Maureen's books, and this one sounds great too. Research reveals so many stories. That was a very sad fact about women being able to by drugs to end their lives. Oh my goodness.

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    1. Hey Carrie,

      Thanks for stopping by! I know I just love history. so interesting.

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  21. I love stories or movies with a heist involved(How to Steal a Million with Audrey Hepburn is so fun). I will be putting this on my must read list! Please include me in the drawing, thanks.
    worthy2bpraised at gmail dot com
    I'm a follower and a subscriber.

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    1. Hey Merry. I love action and suspense woven in a good romance, too. Good luck.

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  22. I didn't realize that prostitutes could obtain from a druggist, for only 10 cent, enough morphine to kill themselves. This is sad but in those days finding another way to support themselves was almost impossible. Adding Bees in the Butterfly Garden to my wish list. Enjoyed the interview ladies. Thanks for the opportunity to enter giveaway.

    misskallie2000 at yahoo dot com

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    1. Yes, a person's character was very important back then and hard to redeem themselves.

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  23. I look forward to reading Maureen Lang's historical romance book...'Bees in The Butterfly Garden'......I have shared on facebook and twitter......babyruthmac16ATyahoo.com

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  24. Just wanted to pop in again to let everyone know I'm reading with interest all of the comments. History is full of fascinating facts, isn't it!

    Thanks, too, for the comments on the lovely cover art. I wish I could take some credit but the work is due entirely to Tyndale's design team. They're wonderful, and I'm very grateful!

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  25. I love Maureen's books, and this one sounds fantastic, too!

    mdimaria3 (at) comcast.net

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  26. Maureen, I love the idea of a "Come as you are party." I might have to try that sometime.

    Debbie, thank you for entering me for the drawing!

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  27. This sounds like a great read. I'm trying to learn more about writing historical fiction and this book would be a great one to learn from. Count me in.

    authorboyles at swbell.net

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  28. It sounds like a good book.
    I also follow you via feedburner.
    wsmarple/at/gmail/dot/com

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  29. Enjoyed the interview. I'd love to win.

    mochawithlinda at gmail dot com

    (btw, I assume you cut and pasted but it says the drawing will be Monday, June 10?)

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  30. Sad to think a woman caught up in prostitution could so easily do away with herself. Sad, sad, sad.

    Your book sounds great. Would love to win a copy.

    Following via GFC and now email.

    desertrose5173 at gmail dot com

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  31. Love-love-love the cover on this book! As for history, it's full of odd bits of trivia. For instance, it was a grandson of William Clark (Meriwether Lewis Clark, Jr.) who built Churchill Downs, the racetrack still in use today. And like his namesake, Meriwether Lewis, he committed suicide.

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  32. I loved the interview. The cover is beautiful. I also enjoyed reading the comments, a history lesson in itself. I learned so much. I would love to win this book. Please enter me. I am a follower.
    Thanks
    Brenda
    scruggs3(at)nctc(dot)com

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