Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Book Giveaway Tammy Doherty's Celtic Cross

Welcome Tammy. I'm glad to have you on my blog this week!

Tammy Doherty lives on a small farm in New England with her husband and two children. They grow perennials for sale and raise chickens, as pets and for eggs. When not writing books or watering plants, she enjoys reading historical and suspense fiction and watching Doctor Who on television. She is the author of three Inspirational Western romances, Celtic Cross, Claddaugh and Celtic Cross. Currently she is working on a contemporary romantic suspense series. Her novels can be found online at Barnes & Noble and Amazon. Visit her on the web at http://tammydoherty.com, http://faith-fiction-friends.blogspot.com/ or on Facebook.




What do you expect from a book? Many people tell me that the romance genre is purely entertainment; that those novels aren’t meant to have a message. Why can’t we be entertained and learn at the same time? Reading historical fiction, whether romance or literature, there’s bound to be something you’ll learn.

Growing up, I read Louis L’Amour books. They’re all similar in theme, and certainly style, though each has a little different setting and characters. Mr. L’Amour made a point of knowing all the locations of his settings. If he wrote about a cave in the hills, you can be sure there’s really a cave there. Because of this I learned a great deal about the geography of the American West. I learned about the attitudes and social customs of days gone by. And I even learned a little about the origin and meaning of some colorful words and phrases. All from a little Western (most of his books are about the same length as a Love Inspired novel).

When I began writing, I didn’t want to turn out a novel that’s so light and fluffy you put it out of mind as soon as you’re done reading. I wanted to craft characters and plots that would connect with my readers and make them think. And I wanted that thinking to carry on in their minds even after the novel was finished. I’m not sure I’ve succeeded—yet—but that’s my goal.

In Celtic Knot I created Abby Finnegan with one thing in mind: if a person has never known love here on Earth, what does it take to accept the Lord’s unconditional love? I put as her foil, and hero, Kyle Lachapelle who grew up virtually steeped in love. The challenge I had with Abby was helping her to grasp the concept of a loving God who allows bad things to happen to His children. I used the fact that she is a mother herself, comparing and contrasting how we parent and how the Lord “parents” us.

Then, because this is a novel and must be entertaining as well as educational (grin), I added in a bunch of villains with varying degrees of conscience and a couple extra “good guys” to help light the way. I researched the time period and location of my setting extensively. Unfortunately, the research did not include a trip to Colorado. Oh well, maybe one day I’ll be able to do research “on location”!

Historical accuracy is important to me. This is another area where I can “teach” my readers. After finishing the first draft of Celtic Knot, I learned that in the late 1800’s bank tellers weren’t called tellers. So I went back and fixed the brief scene where there is a bank teller. In an earlier novel, Celtic Cross, I had written that the heroine listens to the mournful cry of a loon at night—then learned that there aren’t any loons in the location where the story takes place. Oops! The loon swiftly became an owl (grin).

When I read novels by my favorite authors, I look for these little bits of learning about the time period of the story. As a teen reading Westerns the slate of my mind still had lots of empty space for knowledge to be written on. I’ve grown up a lot since then, not just in years but also in experience. Still, I hope to never reach the point of thinking there’s nothing more to learn.





“He that loveth not knoweth not God: for God is love.”

Abby Finnigan struggles to go on with life after the death of her husband. Her family has never been supportive, more so now than ever. The only safe course is to protect her heart. Besides, people only do nice things today because they want something tomorrow.

Secret Service Operative Kyle Lachapelle is working undercover. From the moment he meets Abby, Kyle finds her intriguing—and attractive. But Abby is connected to his counterfeiting case. Can he can trust her?

His guarded attitude confuses Abby. She trusts him with much yet withholds her heart, not wanting to be hurt again. When Kyle begins making arrests, her doubts seem justified.

Will love conquer their fears?

“There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear.”

Be sure to leave your email address. Please check your junk mail on and the day after the drawing. I've had to redraw because of no responses. Subject box will have: winner of (book title). I'll email the winner and they'll have seven days to respond. If I don't hear back I'll draw another name. USA shipping only. Thanks so much and please stop back again! Drawing will be held Monday, October November 1st.

38 comments:

  1. She sounds smart. :) That sounds dumb! Yes, I like to learn something when I read a book too. Thanks.

    gahome2mom/at/gmail/dt/com

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  2. Thanks for the kind words :D I'd like to think I'm smart, but I'm not! Reading, for me, is a fun way to learn new stuff. Sometimes just small tidbits that are great for trivia games :d

    And thank you, Debbie Lynne, for having me with you this week. I'm thrilled to have this opportunity to connect with fellow readers.

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  3. Historical accuracy is very important to me in the books that I read. This is a culture about which there are not many CBA books and I would love to read this one.

    julesreffner(at)gmail(dot)com

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  4. I agree with the other comments, historical accuracy is very important. I read a book by a pretty famous author who described a castle in Scotland. We were planning a trip to Scotland, so we put the castle in our itinerary. It was so different from the way she wrote about it in the book. That taught me to be correct. You never know who will be checking up on you.

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  5. Thanks for stopping by, Julia & Kathy!

    In my first book, Celtic Cross, the "big city" town is modeled on Fort Collins, CO. But I took literary license with things like what buildings were where, etc., so renamed the town. For the hotel in the novel, I used descriptions based on an actual historical hotel, but again changed the name. I was so scared someone would yell at me if I got it wrong!

    In the second book, Claddaugh, there's an upcoming election. For this I used real historical data. The actual candidates names and my characters had opinions of who to vote for based on what those real people had as campaign promises/agendas.

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  6. I feel historical accuracy is important to me. It allows me to be informed and entertained at the same time. I retain better when I am learning in a way that will help me remember and a good story does just that.

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  7. Bravo, bravo! I love historical fiction.

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  8. I've read the book once and plan to read it again. If I win the drawing, I'll pass it on to a friend.

    jean

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  9. Thanks for coming by, Jean and Leanna. I'll up the offer on the book give away - whoever wins will be able to choose which one of my 3 books you'd like to receive.

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  10. What good points about research, Tammy. BTW, Celtic Knot looks wonderful. Thanks for hosting this great discussion, Debbie Lynne.

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  11. I had fun reading your blog and you already know I love your books and am waiting patiently? for the next one.keep up the good work.Thanks to Debbie Lynne for hosting you.The rest of the authors sound interesting also.Soooo many books so little time.Kay Combs-kay.combs@yahoo.com

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  12. Greetings,
    Sounds like a wonderful book.
    I've never heard of the author before, but love to try out new ones.
    Thanks for the giveaway.
    Blessings,
    Trinity Rose
    wandaelaine at gmail dot com

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  13. Historical accuracy is important to me, too, and I like Westerns, so count me in on this one, please. :)

    hismercysurrounding(at)yahoo(dot)com

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  14. count me in!

    sheree
    neednspace at aol dot com
    booknroll.blogspot.com

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  15. This series looks very interesting!

    pepsi324[at]yahoo[dot]com

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  16. I agree with everyone above. Historical accuracy is important and it adds to the story. I just couldn't take it seriously if a book lacked that. Any who, I would love to win one of these books! Carman sent me! =)

    gracethorson at gmail dot com

    God bless!
    ~Grace

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  17. I would love to win on of these books! They sound great!

    Thanks,
    Jennifer

    jmschwindt at cox dot net

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  18. So, what were bank tellers called? You've got me curious!

    Nice post, Tammy!

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  19. Wow! Books that carry all my favorite genres. AMAZING! This is an excellent thing, you giving one away! Thanks! I would love to be the recipient!
    God Bless,
    April
    apeygirl at gmail dot com

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  20. This book sounds really good. Love the cover. Looking forward to reading it. Thanks for giving away a copy.
    plhouston(at)bellsouth(dot)net

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  21. Tammy's writings are new to me, I'm regretting not having read one of her novels before. I like the term "historical accuracy" and that Tammy researches to be accurate about details in her writing. I enjoy learning things like she mentioned in her informative interview. This book is very appealing to me, beginning with the title and book cover. I'm putting Tammy's book on my TBR list. Thank you for this giveaway and the chance to win Tammy's book. I hope I do!

    Blessings,
    Barb Shelton
    barbjan10 at tx dot rr dot com

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  22. Love historical fiction! Thanks for the chance to win.
    bkhabel at gmail dot com

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  23. Thank you everyone who visited today. I'm grateful for the support and excited by all your interest :D

    In his blog, Chip MacGregor states that story is more important than historical accuracy. He's a highly successful agent so I'm not going to say he is wrong. But I think lack of accuracy turns-off readers (as Grace mentions). Chip's post is more about using real people in fiction. I feel if you are going to have an historical figure doing or saying something that isn't the currently accepted version of history, you need to have good reasons & show them. You should also be sure the rest of your story is very accurate, to lend believability to your fictionalization.

    Okay, I'm off the soap box now :-)
    Besides - I'm preachin' to the choir. So happy that other readers believe in accuracy, too.

    Tammy

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  24. Oh, and Sally (waving to wonderful & patient CP!) bank tellers in the late 1800's were simply called clerks. Nothing fancy or mysterious, I'm afraid.

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  25. I would love to read this book, it sounds really good.
    twoofakind12@yahoo.com

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  26. Love the name of this book. Clerks for Bank Tellers, and Domestic Engineers for Housewives.

    alekee02[at]yahoo[dot]com

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  27. Thanks, Maureen and Debbie, for your kind words :-) I kept a Celtic theme with these 3 book titles (even though they are set in the American West).

    Maybe "Clerk for Bank Tellers" could be a book title? Or Domestic Engineering Housewives as Clerks?!!

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  28. would enjoy reading this novel...thanks for the chance :)

    karenk
    kmkuka at yahoo dot com

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  29. I would love to win this book! Thanks for the generous giveaway!

    - Kait
    momiswayweird(at)gmail(dot)com

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  30. Ohh, this book looks really good! Please count me in on the giveaway! Thanks!!

    - Katie M

    legacy1992(at)gmail(dot)com

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  31. Thank you everyone who stop by this past week to check out my post and enter to win a copy of my book. You people are the reason I write!

    Oh, and Kait, I love your email address. My daughter is always telling me I'm weird. Her friend told me that I'm the cool parent. I guess weird is relative!

    Blessings to all of you,
    Tammy

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  32. I've just added these all to my wishlist - even if I don't win, I plan on buying them. It sounds like a great series!

    norgemtgal[at]gmail[dot]com

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  33. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  34. This sounds like a great book thanks for the chance to win

    ABreading4fun [at] gmail [dot] com

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  35. Dev, Kristy and Apple Blossom - so glad you could drop in. Especially grateful for your words, Dev, about adding my books to your wish list. Words like that and "sounds great" are all the encouragement a writer needs. Well, maybe not "all" but it sure feels good to hear those types of kind words :D

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  36. Sounds interesting. I would love to read this book. I came over from Carmen's blog. njloewen@sasktel.net

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  37. Carmen sent me and I'd like very much to win Tammy's great book. I like the title and the cover and would pick it up to look through if I were in a book store. Thanks for the giveaway and the chance to win this book. I hope I do!

    Barb Shelton
    barbjan10 at tx dot rr dot com

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  38. Thank you, Norma and Barb, for popping in and sharing your kind words. And thank you Carmen for sending them!

    I've had loads of fun reading your comments about historical accuracy and finding new people to write for. I hope you all win!

    Blessings,
    Tammy

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